Kaldi And The Dancing Goats: How One Boy “Discovered” Coffee

Kaldi Coffee Hands Beans

Source: Flickr

While some may think of Italy as the epicenter of the world’s coffee addiction, the world’s most popular drug arrived to Europe fairly late in history. In fact, coffee was born in Ethiopia. Both the arabica and robusta varieties have their origins there.

Today, around 5,000 varieties of arabica grow in Ethiopia, more than in any other country on earth. One of the most charming stories of the human discovery of the caffeine-rich beans originates from Ethiopia, too. The tale of Kaldi supposedly took place around the 9th century in what is today the province of Kaffa.

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Alejandro Duran Turns Trash Into An Incredible Art Project

Toothbrushes Alejandro Duran

Source: Bored Panda

We must look no further than the nasty, thousand-mile-wide strip of decomposing plastic in the northern Pacific Ocean to know that our world is becoming more polluted. Yet artist Alejandro Duran doesn’t let this reality deter his creative process; rather, this reality incites it.

Rounding up oceanic debris found along Mexican coast lines, Duran upcycles it into art that’s anything but wasteful. Site-specific and color-driven, these pieces compose Washed Up, a refreshing project that begins with trash and ends with a beautiful, thought-provoking installation.

Lightbulbs Upcycled as Art

Source: Slip Talk

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Our Earth In Crisis: Photos Of A Changing World

earth in crisis surface

A view of our home from above. NASA Source: Mashable

Forty five years ago, the world observed its very first Earth Day. And yet, it would take decades of discord, troubling discoveries and subsequent environmental activism before such an event would gain enough popularity to even be thinkable.

In the preceding decades, modern warfare and heavy industrialization-led growth had proliferated throughout all hemispheres. In the United States, the launch of Sputnik catapulted our attention to space and resulted in the creation of NASA, an institution that would aid substantially in studying the effects of our actions on Earth. In the late 1960s, it seemed–very much as it does today–that we stood at a precipice: change our behavior and interactions with the environment now, or suffer accordingly.

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What We Love This Week, Volume CXXIII

Mt St Helens Eruption

An ash plume billows from the crater atop Mount St. Helens hours after its eruption began on May 18th, 1980, in Washington state. The column of ash and gas reached 15 miles into the atmosphere, depositing ash across a dozen states. Source: The Atlantic

The Deadliest Volcanic Eruption In United States History, Just 35 Years Ago This Week

Mt St Helens Trees

A wrecked logging truck and crawler tractor are shown amidst ash and downed trees near Mount St. Helens two days after an explosive eruption. Source: The Atlantic

While you’ve surely heard of the eruption of Washington’s Mount St. Helen’s, which occurred 35 years ago this week, what you may not realize was that it was an earthquake that triggered the eruption and a landslide (the largest in recorded history) plus mudslides and floods as well as further eruptions over the following days. The resulting jumble of numbers is staggering: the volcanic blast shot 80,000 feet in the air, lopping 1,300 feet off the top of the mountain, spreading ash across 11 states and 5 Canadian provinces, sparking mudslides that ran for 50 miles, ultimately causing over $1 billion in damage. Experience the devastation at The Atlantic.

Mt St Helens Kiss

Fifteen-year-old Heidi Havens gives Allen Troup, 16, a kiss as he prepares to board a Spokane City bus, on May 27, 1980. Spokane residents had to wear face masks while outside for days after the eruption because of possible health threats from volcanic ash sprayed over the area by Mount St. Helens on May 18. Source: The Atlantic

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