Be The Smartest Person In The Room, Join The Just Launched All That Is Interesting Newsletter

Photo Of The Day: Buddhist Monk Shares A Meal With A Tiger

Buddhist Monk Feeds Tiger

Image Source: Reddit

Founded in 1994, Wat Pha Luang Ta Bua, a Theravada Buddhist temple in western Thailand, is also known as “Tiger Temple.” This forest temple/animal sanctuary is, in fact, home to many wild animals, the majority of which are Indochinese tigers. As of July 2014, the total number of tigers living at the temple has risen to 135. Though the temple has fallen under scrutiny for years and even been accused of animal mistreatment, Thai officials have found no evidence. In fact, the temple’s monks have established an extraordinarily unique relationship with the nearby tigers, allowing the big cats to freely wander the temple grounds alongside them.

As wild tigers become increasingly rare in the forests of Asia and the very future of the species remains uncertain, the Tiger Temple continues to rescue these majestic beasts.

De-Extinction: The Who, How, When, And Why Of Bringing Extinct Species Back To Life

Mammoth De-Extinction

Image Source: EarthTalk.org

In 1598, the Dutch landed on the island of Mauritius, just off the coast of Madagascar in the Indian Ocean. Here, they were met by a massive population of flightless, naive, meaty birds. Salivating, the sailors happily began killing them, kindly bestowing the name “dodo” upon the shell-shocked animals. Over the next several decades, humans, and the rats, pigs, monkeys and other animals they brought with them, made short work of the small island and the entire species of the dodo, rendering it extinct by 1662.

This isn’t exactly a unique story, as far as extinction goes. Colonizers move in, and the indigenous animal (as well as human and plant) populations begin to dwindle. But, what if we could apologize for our pillaging ways and resurrect these extinct species?

Continue Reading

Video Of The Day: Graffiti In 1970s NYC

Featured above, Norman Mailer’s 1976 short documentary, “Watching My Name Go By,” provides viewers with an inside look at New York City’s 1970s graffiti art scene. We are not only introduced to a few of the local artists, but the people who passionately opposed them and attempted to permanently wipe their work off the streets.

Mailer’s film does a beautiful job of reminding us that graffiti art was not only an outlet for rebellious street artists; it provided the kids with a “sense of identification” in a world where they felt voiceless.

Historic Battlefields Then And Now

Historic Battlefields Stalingrad Comparison

The setting of the Battle Of Stalingrad, then and now. Source: NNM (left) and LiveJournal (right)

Battles are actually unusual in military history. It’s far more common for one side to be willing or able to fight and for the other side to collapse at once or wage a guerrilla war than it is for rival armies to roll the dice on a few confrontations. Battles are what happen when both sides actually show up armed and looking for trouble.

Continue Reading

Close Pop-in
Like All That Is Interesting

Get The Most Fascinating Content On The Web In Your Facebook & Twitter Feeds