A Dwarf Documents His Life And Interactions With Others In New York City

August 19, 2014

Jonathan Novick gives us a rare insight into dwarfism–and not the kind of “rare insights” that appear nightly on TLC–in this short-length documentary, “Don’t Look Down on Me”. Novick has been living in the city for a little over a year now, and while the experience has been good in general, some of the encounters he’s had have been incredibly frustrating. With the help of a button cam, he shows us how.

The Macabre Sculptures Within The Bone Church

August 19, 2014

If you happen to venture into the Czech Republic’s small suburb of Sedlec, you may stumble upon the Cemetery Church of All Saints. The structure itself looks fairly unassuming, but the outer walls contain some creepy indications of the ghastly findings you are about to encounter inside – actually, less so inside than underneath.

Tucked beneath the small Roman Catholic chapel is the Sedlec Ossuary, which is essentially an enormous mausoleum estimated to hold the remains of between 40,000 and 70,000 dead people. Charming, yes? The vast majority of the deceased met their demise in the 14th and 15th centuries after obviously unsuccessful encounters with the black plague and the Hussite wars. Just the thought of dealing with that many corpses is shudder-worthy on its own, but there’s more … many of the inhabitants’ remains have been used to build giant bone sculptures within the ossuary’s underground walls. Is this pragmatism at its finest?

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Princess Marie Of Romania, One Of The 20th Century’s Earliest International Icons

August 18, 2014

Princess Marie Of Romania 1905

You’re looking at one of the most powerful women in the early 20th century, Marie of Romania. The future queen was born into the British royal family, and it was she who convinced her husband Ferdinand to declare war on Germany at the beginning of World War One. As the war came to a close, it was also Marie who took her cause for the international recognition of an enlarged Romania to the Paris Peace Conference of 1919. An international diplomat and socialite, Marie was loved both at home and abroad, and spent the remainder of her life–after her husband had died–in the countryside.