What We Love This Week, Volume LXXIX

August 22, 2014
Ice Cream Paintings Lion

Source: Bored Panda

Artist Makes Sweet Portraits With Ice Cream

Ice Cream Paintings Portrait

Source: Bored Panda

While popsicle sticks have been a choice tool for burgeoning artists for, well, as long as we’ve been alive, the popsicle stick itself has not. But Iraqi artist Othman Toma is here to change all of that. More Ben and Jerry’s than Hieronymous Bosch, Toma creates tasty works that are just as immaculate as his more traditional portraits. Not necessarily the most efficient way to use food, but maybe this will get more people interested in art.

Ice Cream Paintings Tiger

Source: Bored Panda

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Great News, Caffeine Addicts: Science Says Coffee Is Good For You

August 21, 2014

Drink 2-3 cups of coffee a day and don’t have a ruinous diet? Studies show you’ll live longer than those who don’t and decrease the likelihood of contracting Type-2 Diabetes. Watch on for more pro-coffee facts to throw at people who say you have a “problem”.

1924 Owens Valley Protests Foreshadow California’s Scary Drought Problems

August 21, 2014
Owens Valley Protests LA 1902

A dusty Los Angeles street in 1902 Source: Water Power

Even with its green lawns and swimming pools, Los Angeles―and Southern California―is a semi-desert. Dropping a major city into this climate with limited water resources seems ridiculous now, but when LA’s population began to boom in the nineteenth century, its leaders believed that the aquifer supplying the city would last.

William Mulholland became the ruthless first superintendent of the then-new Los Angeles Water Department, later the Department of Water and Power (DWP), and later had a famous LA street named after him. In an astonishingly legal and morally bankrupt move, he decided to tap the Owens River, 250 miles away, and bring it to the City of Angels. Eventually, LA drained the Owens Valley dry, but its residents weren’t going down without a fight.

Owens Valley Protests Mulholland

Ken Goldberg’s painting of William Mulholland Source: University Of California Berkeley

The river ended at Owens Lake, at 4,000-foot elevation. Since LA is at sea level, the water could go mostly downhill under its own power. The US Bureau of Reclamation promised Owens Valley farmers they’d build an irrigation system. Through underhanded, borderline-illegal tactics, Mulholland got the plan nixed.

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