The Search for Cervantes’ Bones

Cervantes Bones Skeleton Rider

The skeleton of Don Quixote as depicted by José Guadalupe Posada. Source: Library of Congress

It was supposed to be the end of a quest. 399 years after Miguel de Cervantes died, researchers in Madrid announced this March that they had found the author’s remains in an unmarked crypt. But perhaps fittingly for the creator of The Ingenious Don Quixote de la Mancha, this final chapter of Cervantes’ odyssey has spun out a dozen new side-stories to explore.

Here’s the simple version: the author’s bones were where everyone always thought they had been – in the Convent of the Barefoot Trinitarian Nuns in Madrid. The father of the modern novel had requested to be buried here, and old records said the nuns had granted his request. But his bones were moved during a 17th century building project, and no one knew exactly where they ended up until now.

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Korean Refugees Flee Pyongyang During The Korean War

Flights Of Refugees Pyongyang 1950

In the winter of 1950, the United States and accompanying UN actors were on the retreat. Having been defeated during the Battle of the Ch’ongch’on due to the flood of Chinese troops entering on the North Korean side, UN forces were sent packing down the Korean peninsula, becoming the longest retreat in US military history.

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The 2015 EGU Photo Contest Winners Convey Earth’s Beauty

EGU Photo Contest Heiturpottur

“Heiturpottur” by Morgan Jones. Source: GeoLog

Three winners from the 2015 European Geosciences Union (EGU) Photo Contest have finally been announced after a week of voting. “Heiturpottur,” captured by Morgan Jones, and “The late Holocene fever” by Christian Massari both stood out as clear winners. This year entrants submitted more than 200 photos to the EGU Photo Contest, covering a variety of geo-scientific topics.

Iceberg Calving

“The late Holocene fever” by Christian Massari. Source: GeoLog

Badlands National Park

“A voyage through scales” by Iain Willis. Source: GeoLog


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X-Ray Art Reveals The Internal Beauty Of Everyday Objects

While many of us consider pretty paintings or sculptures to be the bookends of what the word “artistic” can mean, many artists defy convention and instead strive for innovation. X-ray art is one of those innovative forms. Blurring radiology and photography, even common items become interesting as the x-ray strips back their layers to reveal their often-ignored (and often elegant) internal structures.

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Arie van’t Riet

X Ray Tulips

Flowers are always a popular portraiture subject, under the x-ray or not. Dutch artist/physicist Arie van’t Riet’s foray into floral x-ray was born from a functional purpose: he needed to teach technicians how to use the machine. Since then, his interest is grounded in an aesthetic desire to showcase the inner beauty of his subjects. Source: X-Rays

X-ray Art Negative

Van’t Riet partly colorizes his works to enhance their visual impact. Here is the negative of the preceding image. Source: X-Rays

X-ray Art Frog

Like many other artists, Arie prefers to use everyday items as his subjects – in his case, a combination of flora and fauna. Source: The Guardian

X-ray Art Cat

A cat digging up the garden. Source: X-Rays

X-ray Art Chameleon

A chameleon climbing a begonia. Source: The Guardian

Nick Veasey

X-ray Art Reading

Nick Veasey is another artist who uses x-ray photography as his preferred medium. Veasey initially worked with conventional mediums such as still photography before receiving an opportunity to x-ray a Coke can for a TV show. Source: Nick Veasey

X Ray Wedding Ensemble

In a world seemingly obsessed with appearances, Nick Veasey wants to highlight the aesthetics lurking just beneath the surface. With several popular exhibits and numerous design and photographic awards under his belt, Veasey is arguably the most successful artist in this field. Source: Nick Veasey

X-ray Art Gun

Part of his exhibit dubbed “The X-Man”. Source: Nick Veasey

X-ray Art Punk

An x-ray of your average Oakland Raiders fan. Source: Nick Veasey

X-ray Art Boeing

Nick has the unverified claim of the largest x-ray in the world - a Boeing 777. Source: Wikipedia

Hugh Turvey

X-ray Art Jacket

According to British artist Hugh Turvey, one advantage of x-ray images is the chance to see the world with fresh perspective. Turvey also started out as a conventional photographer, but a commission to create an x-ray image for a rock album cover inspired his transition to the world of x-ray art. Source: Socialphy

X-ray Art Suitcase

Turvey likes to call his images “xograms”, a mash-up between x-rays and photograms. He colors most of his images because it adds an extra layer of depth and also allows the artist to control where the viewer looks. Source: Smithsonian Magazine

X-ray Art Foot

He compares the results of his process to that of a child seeing something for the first time. In fact, one of the artist’s most popular works is an image of his wife’s foot in a stiletto heel. Said Turvey in an interview, “I think we all understand that your foot is going through quite a lot when it is in a stiletto, but to actually physically see it and to see the angle of the bones. Not only do you have this distorted foot, but you have these small nails that were in the actual construction of the shoe. It just looked like a torture device.” Source: Smithsonian Magazine

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For more, check out these videos exploring x-ray art and what the human body looks like when doing yoga under an x-ray:

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