The International Drone Photography Awards’ Incredible Winners

July 21, 2014
Jericsaniel Photography by Drones

2nd Place: jericsaniel, Source: Where Cool Things Happen

We’ve featured our fair share of incredible aerial photography in the past, but never anything like the International Drone Photography Awards. For the first time ever, Dronstagram and partners like National Geographic and GoPro teamed up to find the world’s best drone photography. Since May 15th, more than 2,000 images from all over the world were submitted. Yet only six images were chosen as winners (three regular winners and three People’s Choice winners). Check out the winning drone photography in the images below:

International Drone Photography Awards: The Winners

Winner of International Drone Photography Awards

1st Place: capungaero, Source: HashLush

Drone-Cs Aerial Photography

3rd Place: Drone Capture System, Source: Where Cool Things Happen

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Stunning Charcoal Installations by Seon Ghi Bahk

July 21, 2014

Up close, these dark pieces of natural charcoal look as if they’re floating haphazardly in space. But take a few steps back and the suspended black bodies form something more structurally sound. The result is a dark, partially defined column or artifact the seems to float in the air. These charcoal installations are created using long nylon threads, which are anchored at the top of the installation, keeping the charcoal pieces in midair.

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These 5 Bizarre Word Origins Will Leave You Scratching Your Head

July 20, 2014
Bizarre Word Origins Statues

Source: Cloud Front

The words you use every day are like superheroes; they all have backstories of one kind or another, and while some (Batman) are awesome, others (Robin) are another story. Learning the bizarre histories—and in some cases origin myths—of the common words on this list is like bumping into an old acquaintance and discovering that not only has he always secretly been a crimefighter, he got his start as a circus acrobat.

Mullet

English and French writers have been using the word “mullet” to describe a type of fish with spiny fins from about the mid-15th century. Modern taxonomy nerd Carl Linnaeus hadn’t even been thought of yet, so the name seems to have been applied to different species over the centuries before settling down to describe just one species of North American game fish in 1866. It has a flat head. You can see where this is going.

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