Our Drone Future

March 27, 2014

From Alex Cornell: Our Drone Future explores the technology, capability, and purpose of drones, as their presence becomes an increasingly pervasive reality in the skies of tomorrow.

In the near future, cities use semi-autonomous drones for urban security. Human officers monitor drone feeds remotely, and data reports are displayed with a detailed HUD and communicated via a simulated human voice (designed to mitigate discomfort with sentient drone technology). While the drones operate independently, they are “guided” by the human monitors, who can suggest alternate mission plans and ask questions.

Specializing in predictive analysis, the security drones can retask themselves to investigate potential threats. As shown in this video, an urban security drone surveys San Francisco’s landmarks and encounters fierce civilian resistance.

8 Amazing Wes Anderson Ads

March 27, 2014

A safe first date conversation topic for hipsters around the world, Wes Anderson’s signature aesthetic has delighted, confused and annoyed audiences and critics alike for nearly 20 years. With recent hits like ‘Moonrise Kingdom’ and the classic ‘The Life Aquatic’ under his directing belt, you’d be forgiven for thinking that Anderson deals exclusively in the silver screen. In between movies, though, Anderson dabbles in TV commercial production, employing the same “bizarre meets whimsical” directorial approach that he does in his films. Here are some of his finest commercial works.

Wes Anderson For American Express

Kicking things off with the finest American Express ad you’ll ever see, Anderson’s “My Life, My Card” is a superbly crafted satire of how cinema goers imagine his movies are made. Featuring Jason Schwartzman among other Anderson regulars, the fictitious film set full of geishas and explosions goes to show that he can inject just as much creativity into a commercial as a bigger budget blockbuster.

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Al Capone’s Soup Kitchen

March 26, 2014

Al Capones Soup Kitchen

As US officials inched ever closer to infiltrating and apprehending Al Capone in 1930, the infamous gangster decided that it was high time to generate some good publicity while he still could. Thus, Capone opened up a soup kitchen in one of Chicago’s poorest and most crime filled neighborhoods. On Thanksgiving, Capone famously fed over 5,000 of the Windy City’s most vulnerable constituents. Things went as planned–at least for a time–and the press lauded the gangster for his charitable endeavors. Ultimately, though, this positive coverage only enraged the feds, who then ordered closer surveillance of Capone. A little under a year later, Capone’s new home was the slammer.