4 Wonders Of Our Solar System

August 8, 2014

Even though astronomy is one of our oldest sciences, our understanding of the universe is still in its infancy. There are so many fascinating things in the universe and we don’t even have to travel too far to see them. Many of them are right here in our very own solar system.

Olympus Mons

Solar System Viking

Actual NASA image taken by Viking 1 Source: Wikipedia

For a long time, we considered Olympus Mons, located on Mars, to be the tallest mountain in our solar system. At a height of 14 miles, it is almost three times as tall as Mount Everest, the highest point on our planet.

Now we know that there is actually a slightly taller mountain in our solar system. It is called Rheasilvia and it is located on an asteroid named Vesta. Even so, Olympus Mons remains far more impressive. Although Rheasilvia is a little taller, the mountain on Mars is simply gigantic in scope.

Solar System Crater

Massive crater located right at the center of the mountain Source: European Space Agency

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What We Love This Week, Volume LXXVII

August 8, 2014
Small Man Nature Trees

Source: 500PX

Scenic Self-Portraits To Make You Feel Wonderfully Small

Small Man Nature Canyon

Source: 500PX

It’s easy to misunderstand our size and importance in the scope of the universe. Current natural events suggest that yes, people do have a knack for altering–and perhaps irrevocably so–our climate and ecosystems. And when you look at just how vast these systems and landforms are compared to our puny stature, it’s pretty mystifying that we can. The photos at 500PX highlight that stark contrast, and we encourage you to check it out.

Small Man Nature Desert

Source: 500PX

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The 2014 National Geographic Traveler Photo Contest Winners

August 7, 2014
Byron Inggs Traveler Photo Contest

Photo by Byron Inggs. Source: NY Daily News

National Geographic Traveler magazine is every jet setter’s dream. Chock full of travel tips, guides to exotic locales and full-page color spreads of some of the most beautiful sights imaginable, the magazine could make even the most stationary homebody beg for adventure. So it’s no surprise each year when thousands of photographers worldwide provide images for the National Geographic Traveler Photo Contest.

The rules are simple: photographers submit a recent digital picture for one of four categories that include travel portraits, outdoor scenes, sense of place or spontaneous moments. The judges then evaluate submissions, and winners are announced relatively soon after.

2014 Travelers Contest Winners

Photo by Agnieszka Traczewska. Source: IB Times

National Geographic 2014 Traveler Photo Contest Awards

Photo by Marko Korosec. Source: NY Daily News

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