8 Amazing Wes Anderson Ads

March 27, 2014

A safe first date conversation topic for hipsters around the world, Wes Anderson’s signature aesthetic has delighted, confused and annoyed audiences and critics alike for nearly 20 years. With recent hits like ‘Moonrise Kingdom’ and the classic ‘The Life Aquatic’ under his directing belt, you’d be forgiven for thinking that Anderson deals exclusively in the silver screen. In between movies, though, Anderson dabbles in TV commercial production, employing the same “bizarre meets whimsical” directorial approach that he does in his films. Here are some of his finest commercial works.

Wes Anderson For American Express

Kicking things off with the finest American Express ad you’ll ever see, Anderson’s “My Life, My Card” is a superbly crafted satire of how cinema goers imagine his movies are made. Featuring Jason Schwartzman among other Anderson regulars, the fictitious film set full of geishas and explosions goes to show that he can inject just as much creativity into a commercial as a bigger budget blockbuster.

{ Read The Rest Of This Post… }

Al Capone’s Soup Kitchen

March 26, 2014

Al Capones Soup Kitchen

As US officials inched ever closer to infiltrating and apprehending Al Capone in 1930, the infamous gangster decided that it was high time to generate some good publicity while he still could. Thus, Capone opened up a soup kitchen in one of Chicago’s poorest and most crime filled neighborhoods. On Thanksgiving, Capone famously fed over 5,000 of the Windy City’s most vulnerable constituents. Things went as planned–at least for a time–and the press lauded the gangster for his charitable endeavors. Ultimately, though, this positive coverage only enraged the feds, who then ordered closer surveillance of Capone. A little under a year later, Capone’s new home was the slammer.

Do Ho Suh’s Fabric Installations Show That Home Is Wherever You Sew It

March 26, 2014

Traveling through the major modern metropolises of our world, Korean artist Do Ho Suh has recreated his own heart’s keeper in the form of silk-constructed homes. Representing memories of his prior residences, the colorful installations span all the way from Suh’s childhood to his adult life. Suspended from the ceilings of museums and art galleries, his works bring the concept of “carrying a space in a suitcase” to life.

{ Read The Rest Of This Post… }