The Totally Weird Origins Of English Idioms

June 16, 2014

If nothing else, social media has taught us that at some point all of us start to sound like our moms and dads. The Bible might give the mouths of babes all the credit, but some pretty strange things can come out of adult lips as well: those confusing old idioms that sometimes have children and teens scratching their heads regarding their meaning.

Here are some idioms that perhaps mama used to say, which might even date back to Shakespeare, but still get used today.

English Idioms: “Waking Up On The Wrong Side Of The Bed”

English Idioms Wrong Bed

Source: WordPress

In the face of a wailing boy or girl, moms might say that their child got up on the wrong side of the bed that morning. Such a phrase might lead the cranky and inquisitive child to wonder how there can be a right and a wrong side of a bed. The saying proves that we humans are quite a superstitious lot. It may date back all the way to ancient Rome when it was considered bad luck to get out of bed on the left side, as it might portend a bad day. It is also written that anything associated with the left (imagine this, liberals) was considered sinister. Innkeepers, therefore, made sure that the left side of a bed was pushed against the wall to ward off any evil.

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Cutting Up The World Cup

June 15, 2014

Wish you could get into arguably the biggest sporting event in the planet but prefer musical drops to kick offs? This video incorporates all the sport’s movement into a dynamic music video unlike anything you’ve ever seen. Enjoy!

These Creepy Masks Prove Just How Odd Humanity Is

June 15, 2014
Creepy Masks Scolds Bridle

Source: Boing Boing

This little item is one of the more disturbing objects on the list. A ‘Scold’s bridle’ is a fearsome looking thing from the 1500s whose purpose was to cure your gabbing woman of her nasty—and apparently singularly female—tendency to fight or gossip. When secured to the woman’s head, this contraption rendered her incapable of speaking. Occasionally, these creepy masks would be studded with spikes near the mouth, which meant that if the overly chatty female dared try to speak, she would experience immediate pain.

The mask had its origins in Britain and spread like a disease to some other European countries, with the punishment normally handed down by a local magistrate. This particular example features a bell, which was meant to draw even more attention and embarrassment unto the wearer. It continued to be used until the early 1800s as a punishment for another marginalized sect of society: the poor.

Creepy Masks Splatter Mask

Source: Listverse

While “splatter mask” sounds like a horrifying name to an object meant for a rather cruel punishment, these devices were actually protective gear worn by British tank operators in World War I. Tanks in the early 1900s had not reached their full operating or safety potential; they often broke down and could be all but destroyed by enemies’ heavy artillery.

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