The 20 Craziest Laws In The United States

June 5, 2014
Craziest Laws Body Vest

1. If you want to kill someone in New Jersey, you probably shouldn’t wear a body vest. In addition to the legal problem of, you know, killing someone, New Jersey law forbids an offender to use or wear “a body vest while engaged in the commission of, or an attempt to commit, or flight after committing or attempting to commit murder, manslaughter, robbery, sexual assault, burglary, kidnapping, criminal escape or assault.”

2. A law in Missouri bans the sale of yellow margarine. This prohibition dates back to the 19th century, and while it isn’t upheld, such a crime can smack the offender with a $500 fine and six months in the slammer if he or she dares peddle the imitation spread multiple times.

{ Read The Rest Of This Post… }

A Cormorant Fisherman In Repose

June 4, 2014
Cormorant Fisherman Li River

Source: 500PX

Existing nearly 300 years before the Magna Carta was issued, cormorant fishing is a traditional fishing method historically employed by Chinese and Japanese people. To catch fish, the fishermen tie a snare around the bird’s throat so that it cannot swallow large fish. Rather, it holds the fish in its throat and coughs it up when the fisherman brings the bird back to the boat.

What Remains Of The 1893 Chicago World’s Fair

June 4, 2014
Chicago Fair Ticket

Source: Blogspot

Up to the moment that the Chicago World’s Fair opened to the public on May 1, 1893, crews scrambled to replant landscaping that had been washed away in a torrential rain storm. Puddles drowned the newly sodded lawns and some paint was still wet, but to the eyes of that day’s fairgoers, it was nothing short of a photo finish. The few remaining pieces of the Fair dazzle today’s viewers just like they did over a century ago.

Rather than a simple map, enjoy UCLA’s three-dimensional recreation of the Fair:

In the nineteenth century, cities were filthy places. Factory pollution and dust clogged the air. So when fairgoers were greeted by the glimmering Court of Honor, nicknamed the White City, it seemed like they had been transported to another world. Overseeing the Fair’s design and construction, Daniel Burnham had the huge neoclassical buildings coated in soft white paint so that they would “glow” in the sunlight.

{ Read The Rest Of This Post… }