Carhenge – When Metal Meets Art

Roadside Sculpture

Source: History

Stonehenge is one of the world’s most well-known and mysterious monuments, but you don’t have to travel all the way to Salisbury, England in order to see it. As with most other European icons, the United States—more specifically Nebraska—has appropriated one of the continent’s most impressive artifacts for its own enjoyment. The small difference here? This Nebraskan Stonehenge is made out of cars.

Side View

Source: Carhenge

That’s right. If you happen to travel to Alliance, Nebraska, make sure to stop by Carhenge. As the name suggests, the monument is a replica of the famous Stonehenge but formed with discarded automobiles. Even so, this isn’t some kind of huckster tourist trap. The entire construction consists of 38 different vehicles, all of which are painfully arranged to form a 100-foot wide circle that emulates the actual arrangement found at Stonehenge. Most impressive of all is that Carhenge is the brainchild of just one man – artist Jim Reinders.

Continue Reading

30 Rockefeller Center, 1933

30 Rockefeller Center 1933

Had the stock market not crashed in 1929, there is a high likelihood that we would associate Rockefeller Center with an ornate opera house, not an ice skating rink. When John D. Rockefeller Jr. leased the space from Columbia University, he initially intended to build a Metropolitan Opera House on site, but financing troubles meant that he essentially would have to construct the building on his own.

Completed in 1939, Rockefeller Center’s construction was considered the largest private building project of modern times and one that employed a whopping 40,000 people in its nine-year development process. Interestingly enough, this private operation eventually became the site of a number of public agents like British Intelligence and the British Security Coordination, who occupied the space during World War Two.

When Texas Sprayed DDT On Citizens To Prevent Polio

Yes, this happened in San Antonio, Texas. The director of the city’s Department of Health, H.L. Crittenden, ordered the spraying of DDT along every one of over a thousand streets in May, 1946 in an ill-fated attempt to wipe out polio. A handful of other cities joined in, like Rockford, Illinois, and Paterson, New Jersey. Such an event came from the misguided notion that polio was spread by mosquitoes or other insects. Jonas Salk had yet to begin his groundbreaking work that culminated in a polio vaccine in 1955.

Learn more about the disease and the panic it caused in this short clip:

DDT Iron Lung

Many patients with the paralytic form of polio had to be cooped up in an iron lung because their chest muscles wouldn’t work–they couldn’t breathe
Source: NPR

Continue Reading

Are We Seeing The End Of War?

As this video explains, we live in an era of increased international cooperation and almost no colonialism. Simply, it’s cheaper to cooperate in the global marketplace than to infiltrate and destroy. Does that mean we’ll see the end of war in our lifetime? The short answer: maybe.