Hubert Blanz Explores Urban Spaces in Hectic Highway Photos

Photos of City From Above

Source: Zeitraumzeit

Anyone who has ever traversed the busy streets of a crowded city will immediately relate to the overwhelming chaos that defines Hubert Blanz’s photography. His artwork is devoid of people, but full of complex architecture. By stacking and manipulating images of roads, homes and cars atop one another, Blanz creates an urban nightmare in which concrete pandemonium reigns. The series, Roadshow, builds upon images of pre-existing roads, intersections, freeways and bridges to create a masterpiece that’s equal parts overwhelming and intriguing.

Roadshow Photographs

Source: Hubert Blanz

Roadshow 4 by Hubert Blanz

Source: Hubert Blanz

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31 Beautifully Abandoned Soviet Monuments

While Francis Fukuyama so cheerily declared that the world had reached “the end of history” in 1992, he was only half right. True, the Soviet Union and its ideological model had collapsed, and the Western model of liberal democracy had prevailed. However, even as ideas come and go, the structures in which we house them tend to take a bit longer to disappear.

Such is the case with the monuments scattered across the former Soviet Union. Before its dissolution, the Soviet Union had an area of 8.65 million square miles, filled with approximately 290 million people. While these abandoned Soviet monuments have succumbed to time and the elements, they remind us of the transformative and lasting power of ideas.

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Abandoned Soviet Monuments Zimnitsa

A communist statue in the tiny town of Zimnitsa, Bulgaria.

Abandoned Soviet Monuments Pillars

Niš, Serbia.

Abandoned Soviet Monuments Spikes

Kosmaj, Serbia.

Abandoned Soviet Monuments Dome

Kruševo, Macedonia.

Abandoned Soviet Monuments Tree

Jasenovac, Croatia.

Abandoned Soviet Monuments Dilapidated

Košute, Croatia.

Abandoned Soviet Monuments Graffiti

Sanski Most, Bosnia and Herzegovina.

Abandoned Soviet Monuments Angle

Ostra, Romania.

Abandoned Soviet Monuments Opening

Tjentište, Bosnia and Herzegovina.

Abandoned Soviet Monuments Spomenik

Petrova Gora, Croatia.

Abandoned Soviet Monuments Beams

Brezovica, Kosovo.

Abandoned Soviet Monuments Sharp

Kolašin, Montenegro.

Abandoned Soviet Monuments Star

Zenica, Bosnia and Herzegovina.

Abandoned Soviet Monuments Stone

Tjentište, Bosnia and Herzegovina.

Abandoned Soviet Monuments Boards

Makljen, Bosnia and Herzegovina.

Abandoned Soviet Monuments Popped

Mitrovica, Kosovo.

Abandoned Soviet Monuments Cube

Ilirska Bistrica, Slovenia.

Abandoned Soviet Monuments Triangles

Korenica, Croatia.

Abandoned Soviet Monuments Circle

Nikšić, Montenegro.

Abandoned Soviet Monuments Tower

Kozara, Bosnia and Herzegovina.

Abandoned Soviet Monuments Landing

Sinj, Croatia.

Abandoned Soviet Monuments Sunburst

Kadinjača, Serbia.

Abandoned Soviet Monuments Hollow

Grmeč, Bosnia and Herzegovina.

Abandoned Soviet Monuments Wings

Podgarić, Croatia.

Abandoned Soviet Monuments Buzludzha Hill

The area outside Buzludzha, Bulgaria

Abandoned Soviet Monuments Shumen

Shumen monument, Bulgaria.

Abandoned Soviet Monuments Soldiers

Russian soldiers facing Moscow. Varna, Bulgaria.

Abandoned Soviet Monuments Man

Monument to 1300 Years of Bulgaria, in the city of Shumen.

Abandoned Soviet Monuments Stairs

Monument of the Bulgarian-Soviet Friendship, Varna, Bulgaria.

Abandoned Soviet Monuments Geometry

Inside the Plovdiv Hillock of Fraternity, Bulgaria.

Abandoned Soviet Monuments Buzludzha

Buzludzha Communist Party Headquarters, Bulgaria.

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Mexico’s Unbelievable Underwater River

At first, the thought–let alone existence–of an underwater river seems paradoxical, if not impossible. Yet an underwater river is precisely what a group of amateur cave explorers discovered when they went scuba diving in Cenote Angelita (meaning “Little Angel”). A cenote is a natural sinkhole that forms when there is a collapse of limestone bedrock that exposes the groundwater below. These natural pits are generally connected to subterranean water sources and may contain deep underground cave systems.

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