These World War One Medical Innovations Will Baffle And Amaze You

June 17, 2014

This year marks the 100th anniversary of the start of World War I, which tore through Europe from 1914 to 1918 and took millions of lives with it. Though most people who would remember the event are gone, the Great War still reverberates through our lives even today. In fact, many life-saving medical innovations that we now take for granted were created during that period by field surgeons and nurses who needed to respond quickly to a number of potentially fatal ailments.

World War One Medical Innovations Field Hospital

A church converted for the entirety of the war as an American army field hospital. Source: Getty Images

Blood transfusions, which help prevent patients from dying of shock or blood loss, started to be used just before the war. It wasn’t until the the war began, though, that the technique was truly put to the test.

World War One Medical Innovations Blood Transfusion

A German blood transfusion kit circa early 20th century. Source: eBay

Sepsis, an all-too-common hospital malady back then, was beaten with the invention of antiseptics. And though it sounds obvious to us today, it was also during WWI that practicing good hygiene and cleanliness in hospitals became a prominent strategy for disease prevention. Penicillin wasn’t discovered until 1928, a decade after the armistice that ended the war in 1918. But even without antibiotics, WWI surgeons brought us out of medicine’s dark ages.

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A Jarring Glimpse At The World’s Prison Populations

June 16, 2014

Prison Population Per 1000

While the United States comprises only 5% of the world’s population, it holds 25% of the world’s prisoners within its borders. According to the American Civil Liberties Union, the US prison population has risen an incredible 700%, rendering the country the world’s largest jailer. At present, one in every 99 adults in the US is locked up — the highest rate of imprisonment in US history. What’s primarily at root? The failed “War on Drugs” and mandatory minimum sentences.

The Totally Weird Origins Of English Idioms

June 16, 2014

If nothing else, social media has taught us that at some point all of us start to sound like our moms and dads. The Bible might give the mouths of babes all the credit, but some pretty strange things can come out of adult lips as well: those confusing old idioms that sometimes have children and teens scratching their heads regarding their meaning.

Here are some idioms that perhaps mama used to say, which might even date back to Shakespeare, but still get used today.

English Idioms: “Waking Up On The Wrong Side Of The Bed”

English Idioms Wrong Bed

Source: WordPress

In the face of a wailing boy or girl, moms might say that their child got up on the wrong side of the bed that morning. Such a phrase might lead the cranky and inquisitive child to wonder how there can be a right and a wrong side of a bed. The saying proves that we humans are quite a superstitious lot. It may date back all the way to ancient Rome when it was considered bad luck to get out of bed on the left side, as it might portend a bad day. It is also written that anything associated with the left (imagine this, liberals) was considered sinister. Innkeepers, therefore, made sure that the left side of a bed was pushed against the wall to ward off any evil.

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