If At First You Don’t Succeed: Companies Whose Success Came After Failure

One of the few truths in life is that you’re not always going to get it right on your first try. This is especially true when your goal is to become an international, multibillion dollar company. Countless businesses have risen and crumbled simply because they offered the wrong product and failed to see it. Others, however, learn to adapt. These companies did just that, and are now some of the biggest corporations in the world.

The Gap

Changing Companies Gap Store

Source: Childrcloth

Today, The Gap is one of the largest apparel retailers in the world. In fact, for a while it was the largest and still has over 3,200 locations worldwide and employs 132,000 people. That’s a giant leap from the first Gap merchandise store, opened in 1969 in San Francisco by Donald and Doris Fisher. To be fair, the company didn’t need to do a complete 180 when it comes to its product lineup, but a little specialization. At first, The Gap sold an odd combination of Levi’s jeans and LP music records.

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15 New Attractions You Need To Visit This Year

Aching to sate your wanderlust this year? 2014 marked the debut of a number of exciting attractions, each offering something different to patrons. Here are some examples of brand new sights to see (and tours to take) from around the globe.

The Smithwick’s Experience, Kilkenny, Ireland

Smithwick’s is Ireland’s oldest beer, and if you prefer a brewery tour that’s a little out of the ordinary, then off to Kilkenny you go–there, you’ll experience not only a pint or two of the perfect ale, but a tour complete with re-enactments of the company’s history. Played out by local actors, holograms, and living portraits of the family who took their business from a small operation to a worldwide brand, the differences between Smithwick’s tour and other brewery tours are obvious. It opened in July 2014, and has since received global acclaim.

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A Brief History Of The World’s Oldest Disease

Leprosy History Old Woman

A portrait of an elderly blind woman at the Nuang Kan Leper Colony in Kengtung, Myanmar. Source: DVB

A plague to rule them all, leprosy is very likely the oldest infectious disease in human history. Written accounts of the disease — sometimes referred to as Hansen’s Disease—date as far back as 600 B.C., and the genetic evidence alone supports the existence of Leprosy infections in 100,000 year-old remains.

While many other human diseases have been around as long as human beings have–such as nutritional night blindness, tuberculosis and of course sexually transmitted infections (syphilis)–Leprosy’s social history is the one that is most inextricably linked with human evolution.
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Most Americans Are Still Seeing Red After The Recession

Income After Great Recession

After home foreclosures, industry collapses and plummeting markets took hold of the United States in the first decade of the 21st century, most Americans are still hurting. In 2014, a Federal Reserve report found that more than a third of American households believe that they’re doing worse now than in 2008, with around 40 percent saying that they’re “just getting by”. This, as 95 percent of income gains from 2009 to 2012 went to the wealthiest one percent of households. As indicated above, while a select few bounced back relatively unscathed from the recession, most of the country was–and still is–seeing red.

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