Salvador Dali’s Mind-Bending Interpretation Of “Alice In Wonderland”

Since at least the 1960s, Lewis Carroll’s classic “Alice in Wonderland” has become something of an institution within hallucinogenic drug culture. From Jefferson Airplane’s “White Rabbit” waxing to The Matrix‘s pill-propelled trips to “Wonderland”, the book’s association with drugs–no matter how loosely rooted in reality–is unlikely to disappear any time soon. With that in mind, it of course makes sense that surrealist artist Salvador Dali, the man who boldly declared that he was drugs, would have provided his own illustrated interpretation of Alice and her trippy friends in 1969.

This collection of heliogravures (a fancy process where the artist etches figures onto a special gel-covered copper plate already exposed to film positives) eventually became one of Dalí’s most prized suites of all time. Blending the timeless whimsy of the children’s tale with the technicolor dreams of the 1960s, it’s easy to see why.

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Dali Alice In Wonderland Rabbithole

Down the Rabbit Hole Source: Brain Pickings

Dali Alice In Wonderland Caucus

A Caucus Race and a Long Tale Source: Brain Pickings

Dali Alice In Wonderland Caterpillar

Advice From a Caterpillar Source: Brain Pickings

Dali Alice In Wonderland Pig

Pig and Pepper Source: Brain Pickings

Dali Alice In Wonderland Frontispiece

Frontispiece Source: Brain Pickings

Dali Alice In Wonderland Little Ill

The Rabbit Sends in a Little Bill Source: Brain Pickings

Dali Alice In Wonderland Lobster Quadrille

The Lobster's Quadrille Source: Brain Pickings

Dali Alice In Wonderland Mad Tea Party

Mad Tea Party Source: Brain Pickings

Dali Alice In Wonderland Mock Turtle

The Mock Turtle's Story Source: Brain Pickings

Dali Alice In Wonderland Pool Tears

The Pool of Tears Source: Brain Pickings

Dali Alice In Wonderland Queen Croquet

The Queen's Croquet Ground Source: Brain Pickings

Dali Alice In Wonderland Who Stole Tarts

Who Stole the Tarts? Source: Brain Pickings

Dali Alice In Wonderland Evidence

Alice's Evidence Source: Brain Pickings

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Salvador Dalí's Surreal Lincoln Lithograph
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For more Salvador Dali goodness, be sure to check out our post on the Best Dali portraits.

Oneonta Gorge: Reason Number 2457 Why Oregon Is A Beautiful State

Oneonta Gorge

Add this beauty as yet another reason why you need to make a trip to Oregon this fall. Oneonta Gorge enjoys its status as a botanical area given its unique aquatic plant life. Why the weird name? The first guy to photograph it (in the mid 19th century) was from the small town of Oneonta, New York.

What Happened to “Occupy Wall Street”?

Poster for Occupy Wall Street

Poster for Occupy Wall Street. Source: Occupy Wall Street

We’re coming up on the third anniversary of the Brooklyn Bridge March that catapulted the Occupy movement into international recognition. At first, OWS was the brainchild of a Canadian anti-advertising, anti-consumerist magazine called AdBusters. Many catalysts were at play: just months prior, WikiLeaks released numerous sensitive documents and video footage regarding American involvement in Iraq and Afghanistan. Kelly Thomas had just been murdered by police in California. The American government was about to raise its “debt ceiling”, effectively forgiving the 1% for the housing crash and widening the gap between the upper and middle classes. The richest 400 Americans became 392% richer and paid 37% less taxes from the early 90s to the year 2007.

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5 Sunken Ships That Are More Interesting Than The Titanic

For a significant chunk of human history, maritime domination was of utmost concern for the world’s leading powers. As the saying went, he who ruled the seas ruled the world. Given the constraints of existing technology, water was really the only viable method of covering long distances from one continent to another. Obviously, this led to many conflicts among nations, and more than a few ships found their ways to a watery grave. Some of these shipwrecks have since been recovered and transformed into spots for historical study or recreation.

HMHS Britannic

For better or worse, everyone’s already heard of the Titanic, which is why it’s been left off the list. That’s not likely the case for its sister ship, the Britannic. This ship was actually built by the same company as the Titanic – the White Star Line. The Britannic was constructed after the sinking of the “unsinkable” Titanic so, obviously, some changes had to be made in order to make it stand up to its reputation. A few extra lifeboats plus a reinforced hull around the boiler room, engine room and other regions vulnerable to icebergs made for smart additions.

Sunken Ships Britannic Front

Admit it, you were thinking of that scene in Titanic Source: Gallery Hip

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