The Most Fascinating Soviet Anti-Alcoholism Propaganda

If you sip on Russian vodka at parties, you can thank Vladimir the Great. Legend has it that the primary reason that Vlad rejected Islam as the state religion was because Islam prohibited the consumption of all alcohol. To a point, that was a good decision on behalf of future Vlads: by 1860 vodka comprised nearly half of Russia’s state revenue. The “party” could only last for so long and as Russia entered World War I and the Bolsheviks came to power, soviet anti-alcoholism propaganda ran rampantly in efforts to curb and prohibit subsequent alcohol consumption:

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Soviet Anti Alcohol Poster 1

"What a shame! He got drunk, swore, smashed a tree and now he's ashamed to look people in the face."

Soviet Anti Alcohol Poster 2

"Fate"

Soviet Anti Alcohol Poster 3

"Get out the drunks out of the workplaces!"

Soviet Anti Alcohol Poster 4

"Don't drink, Dad!"

Soviet Anti Alcohol Poster 5

"Stop! It's the final warning!"

Soviet Anti Alcohol Poster 6

"Have mercy on your future child."

Soviet Anti Alcohol Poster 7

"Rich inner substance."

Soviet Anti Alcohol Poster 8

"Remember – When you drink, your family is hungry."

Soviet Anti Alcohol Poster 9

"For health?"

Soviet Anti Alcohol Poster 10

"Alcohol – Enemy Of Mind"

Soviet Anti Alcohol Poster 11

"And they say we are pigs..."

Soviet Anti Alcohol Poster 12

"Get out!"

Soviet Anti Alcohol Poster 13

"A friend of vodka is an enemy of the Trade Union."

Later on in the 20th century, Soviet Union President Mikhail Gorbachev would become known for his great reform efforts, one of which included yet another anti-alcohol campaign. While in some ways Gorbachev’s partial-prohibition had a positive effect on alcoholism itself (life expectancy increased while crime rates fell), his story offered outcomes not unlike other preceding (and unsuccessful) prohibition efforts: it largely devastated the economy and led to the increased prevalence of dangerous black markets. Opting out of the Pyrrhic victory that prohibition tends to provide, in 2010 President Dmitri Medvedev decided to double the minimum price of a bottle of vodka in order to confront the problem more efficiently and effectively.

Thanks to io9 for these images.

Prohibition’s Happy Ending

End Of Prohibition

While the intentions of prohibition proponents were often based on innocuous Christian maxims, the national outcome was markedly less holy. During World War One, the Anti-Saloon League was successful in achieving a nationwide prohibition of the sale and production of alcohol..and ushering in a new wave of organized crime. Ultimately, prohibition came to a much-needed close with the passage of the Twenty-first Amendment to the United States Constitution on December 5, 1933. With that said, getting sloshed in public was still considered a poor sign of public decorum.

The World’s Craziest Bars, Part 2

The second part of All That Is Interesting’s series on the world’s craziest bars:


Sugarloaf Kiosk, Brazil

Craziest Bars Sugarloaf

Sugarloaf Kiosk’s bar isn’t as crazy as the effort you have to make to get there. Located in Rio de Janeiro, the mountain-top bar is only accessible via two ways: a 75-passenger cable car ride or a steep 1, 296 foot climb to reach the summit.

Craziest Bars Sugarloaf 2


Floyd’s Pelican Bar, Jamaica

Craziest Bars Floyds

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The World’s Craziest Bars

The World’s Craziest Bars: Casa Pocho, Spain

The World's Craziest Bars Casa Pocho

Casa Pocho is a bar in Spain where being rude is not an option but rather a necessity. Co-owned by Bernard Mariusz and Michal Lotocki, the bar offers free beer and tapas to customers who insult its bartenders. Barring severe rude words, the customers are allowed to spew milder insults including jerk and idiot. The inspiration behind it? In the midst of a recession, people need to let off some steam.

The Clinic, Singapore

Clinic Bar Singapore

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