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Eighteen Apollo 11 Facts You’ve Never Heard Before

Astronaut Moon American Flag

Source: NASA

The world’s first pictures of Pluto and its icy mountains arrived just days before the 46th anniversary of what is surely history’s most momentous outer space occasion. On July 20, 1969, Apollo 11 astronauts Neil Armstrong and Edwin “Buzz” Aldrin made history as the first humans to land on the moon. The mission’s third astronaut, Michael Collins, continued in lunar orbit while his comrades made history.

Even though the moon landing was a profound technological and scientific achievement as well as an unparalleled symbol of national pride, there are still plenty of details that most people don’t know…

Armstrong, Aldrin, and Collins traveled 240,000 miles in just a little over three days (76 hours to be exact) to reach the moon’s lunar orbit. As the lunar module separated from the command module and began its descent to the moon, people from all over the world stopped what they were doing to tune into live coverage of the landing. To see the original broadcast, watch below (skip to minute 20 for the live coverage from the moon):

For more info sure to make you the smartest person in the room, check out these interesting facts about the world!

What We Love This Week, Volume CXXIX

Forest Fire Aerial Smoke

June 7: Smoke rises from the Bogus Creek Fire, one of two fires in the Yukon Delta National Wildlife Refuge in southwest Alaska. Source: The Atlantic

Wildfires Rage In The West

Forest Fire Silhouette Glow

June 13: Flames consume dry vegetation at the Saddle Fire in the Shasta-Trinity National Forest near Hyampom, California. Sparked by lightning, the wildfire scorched more than 1,500 acres in drought-parched Northern California. Source: The Atlantic

While wildfire season is far from over, the West Coast and Alaska have already suffered devastating blows. With a record 700 fires to date this year, Alaska has taken the largest hit, losing over 1.8 million acres. Although higher temperatures and lower humidity are to blame, the astounding number of lightning strikes (6,000-10,000 bolts per day) may be the major culprit. Elsewhere, California, Oregon, and Washington have lost thousands of acres. As total acreage lost has surged in the last two decades, many climate change experts warn that things will only get worse. Survey the damage at The Atlantic.

Wildfire Smoke Plume Cloud

June 18: A smoke plume from the Lake Fire in the San Bernardino National Forest is seen at sunset, rising over the Coachella Valley from Palm Springs, California. About 500 firefighters have been battling this 7,500-acre fire, which is still only 5% contained. Source: The Atlantic

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What We Love This Week, Volume CXXVIII

First Color Photo NYC

Mulberry Street, New York Source: Vintage Everyday

The First Color Photographs Of The United States

First Colorized Grand Canyon

The Grand Canyon Source: Vintage Everyday

On some subconscious level, most of us imagine that the world before, say, 1920 existed in black and white. And why not? That’s what the photographic record of the era would have us believe. But as far back as 1889–14 years before the more well-known Autochrome–the Photochrom process was producing color photography. The images here, produced by the Detroit Photographic Company in the late 1800s and early 1900s, are the first color photographs of the United States. From New York to the Rockies to the redwoods, see more of the collection at Vintage Everyday.

Statue Of Liberty Colorized

Sunset from the Battery, New York Source: Vintage Everyday

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Manzanar Relocation Center: American Concentration Camps Remembered

Manzanar Relocation Center

Source: Wikimedia

As concentration camps were liberated toward the end of World War II, no doubt that many attributed such an achievement to the work of the United States. But just as the US federal government worked abroad to win the war and put an end to concentration camps, at home it developed some pretty horrific internment camps of its own.

Anti-Japanese sentiment was at an all-time high following the attack on Pearl Harbor, and this widespread paranoia led to the forced relocation of more than 120,000 people of Japanese descent. Involuntarily placed in internment camps like Manzanar Relocation Center, Japanese-American citizens will never forget these dark years.

Internment Camps in America

Source: Wikimedia


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