45 Woodstock Photos That Will Transport You Back To 1969

Forty-five years ago this weekend, the mother of all rock festivals took place. Billed as “An Aquarian Exposition: 3 Days of Peace & Music”, over 400 thousand revelers flocked to Bethel, New York to take part in what would become the zenith of 1960s counterculture. Today, we take a look back at the highlight of the summer of love with these forty-five beautiful Woodstock photos:

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Woodstock Poster

Billed as "An Aquarian Exposition: 3 Days of Peace & Music", Woodstock was organized by Michael Lang, John Roberts, Joel Rosenman, and Artie Kornfeld with presale tickets available for $18 (equivalent to $120 today).

Abandoning Cars

Hundreds of thousands of people descended upon Bethel twenty-four hours before the concert was slated to start. With traffic gridlocked for miles, many abandoned their cars and simply walked to the festival grounds.

Woodstock Opening Ceremony

Satchidananda Saraswati, an Indian religious teacher, delivered the opening ceremony invocation at Woodstock.

In The Rain

On and off again rain became a staple of the Woodstock weekend, though that didn't stop the energy or proceedings of the festival.

Aerial Photograph Of Woodstock

Initially expecting only 100,000 people, Woodstock swelled to over 400,000 revelers. Concert organizers realized that they had neither the means or resources to prevent the flood of people and thus made the concert 'free' by cutting all the fences surrounding the festival area.

Jerry Garcia

Jerry Garcia poses for a photograph before the Grateful Dead performed at Woodstock.

Jamming On The Sitar

Ravi Shankar plays the sitar during his performance on Friday night.

Grass Hut At Woodstock

Impromptu shelters were common place -- here, a group rest in the grass hut they built for the weekend.

Clothing Optional

Very much in the spirit of the times, clothing was considered optional for many festival-goers.

Signs At Woodstock

Heady vibes.

Woodstock Photos Jimi Hendrix

The last act to perform at Woodstock, Jimi Hendrix went on Monday morning to conclude the festival. By the time he went on stage, only 30,000 festival-goers remained.

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And if you love all things Woodstock, we recommend you check out these videos:

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12 Badass Revolutionary War Women You’ve Never Heard Of

The American Revolution was fought on the homefront, which means that women and children were often caught up in the fighting in one way or another. It was their war, too. Remember Rosie the Riveter? She symbolizes the women who worked in the factories and ran the family farms and shops while men were away fighting in WWII.

And there were many women just like Rosie in the Revolutionary War, too. A group of Philadelphia women held the first-ever fundraiser in America; they raised much-needed funds for General George Washington’s Continental Army. Less political wives and mothers even pitched in to sew the army’s uniforms. But some women felt a stronger call of duty; they are the badass women of the Revolutionary War. We begin with a short primer on the art of spycraft in that era.

Then there were the spies, scouts and messengers. Women were useful in that capacity because they were often considered to be above suspicion. Frankly, men of the era usually assumed that women weren’t very bright, which gave them opportunities to listen in on secret meetings. They could also use feminine wiles, disguises, and other ruses to carry out their covert actions. A few members of Gen. Washington’s Culper Spy Ring, operating out of Long Island, were women. Among them were Anna Strong and the unnamed Agent 355. Both names could have come straight out of a James Bond film, but I assure you, this was real life. And death: many historians believe that Agent 355 was caught by the British and died on their fetid prison ship Jersey after giving birth to a son.

Revolutionary War Women Interior Jersey

The interior of the British prison ship Jersey, moored in New York Harbor. Source: WordPress

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The Historic Battle Of Cowpens

Battle Of Cowpens

Outnumbered and out-resourced, the 1781 Battle of Cowpens was an essential win for the American forces during the War of Independence. Continental Army leader Daniel Morgan’s strategy — to weaken, disorganize and trap British forces “by fire” — proved to be successful. Historians would later praise the general for being the only general in American history “to produce a significant original tactical thought”.

The (Seriously Sweet) History of Doughnuts

Each year we celebrate National Doughnut Day, a holiday erected in 1938 to honor the Salvation Army’s “Doughnut Lassies.” Today, the doughnut holiday means free doughnuts (and other sweet perks) from many local shops. While it can be hard to imagine a world without maple bacon bars and apple pie cheddar doughnuts, this tasty treat hasn’t been around forever. That’s why we’ve compiled a seriously sweet history of doughnuts that is sure to send you scrambling to Krispy Kreme before the day is over.

Tasty History of Doughnuts

Source: Wired

While the history of doughnuts in America is relatively short, people have been making similar treats throughout the world for centuries. In Ancient Rome and Greece, cooks fried strips of pastry dough and covered them in various sweet and savory flavors. In Medieval times, Arab individuals dipped fried dough into sugary syrup, and Germans made a savory version in the 1400s when sugar was scarce. These fried dough treats were not the same as today’s doughnut, but they laid the foundation for doughnuts to come.

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