34 Black And White Photos Restored With Brilliant Color

From an intimate portrait of Mark Twain to an incredible overhead photograph of the D-Day invasion, we take a look history’s most important people and events transformed from black and white photos into beautiful color images:

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Testing A Bulletproof Vest In 1923

The inventor of the bulletproof vest tests one of the first prototypes in Washington DC in 1923.

Lou Gehrig

Lou Gehrig after finishing his "The Luckiest Man on the Face of the Earth" speech at Yankee Stadium on July 4th, 1939.

Race Mixing Color Black And White Photos

Protestors in Little Rock, Arkansas demonstrate against school integration in 1959.

Walt Whitman In 1868

Walt Whitman in 1868.

Girls Deliver Ice In 1918

A pair of girls unload ice in 1918.

Lee Harvey Oswald

Lee Harvey Oswald shortly before he would be assassinated by Jack Ruby.

Black and White Photos Turned Into Color

A Royal Air Force pilot receives a haircut in between missions during World War 2.

Nihang Bodyguard

A Nihang bodyguard serving in the Nizam of Hyderabad's irregular Sikh army. In his right hand he holds a khanda sword, and in his left a ball and chain flail. The all-steel chillanum dagger in his cummerbund is traditionally associated with southern India. He also wears a shield, a second sword and a pistol, the butt of which is visible under his left arm. His battle-turban is fortified with razor-sharp steel quoits, miniature sword blades and steel chains.

Golden Gate Bridge In 1905

The Golden Gate Bridge in mid-construction in the 1930s.

Claude Monet In 1923

Claude Monet poses with various paintings in 1923.

Propaganda Posters 1942

In 1942, a room full of artists produce propaganda posters that will be used in the United States during World War 2.

Gettysburg Veterans 1913

A pair of Civil War veterans exchange stories during the 50th anniversary of the Battle of Gettysburg in 1913.

Marilyn Monroe

Marilyn Monroe

Flipping Burgers In 1938

A cook flips burgers at a state fair in 1938.

Pablo Picasso

Pablo Picasso

Clam Seller In Little Italy

A clam seller does some business in Little Italy, New York City in 1900.

Mark Twain In Color

Mark Twain

Helen Keller Meets Charlie Chaplin

Helen Keller meets Charlie Chaplin in 1919.

Elizabeth Taylor In 1956

Elizabeth Taylor in 1956.

Abraham Lincoln

Abraham Lincoln

Albert Hitchcock On The Set Of Birds

Alfred Hitchcock seen in mid-direction on the set of Birds in 1963.

Titanic Disaster

A young newsboy sells newspapers in London in 1912 following the sinking of the Titanic.

Sharon Tate Black And White Photos

Sharon Tate poses for a photograph in the early 1960s.

Colorized History

A pair of African-American troops pose by artillery on Easter 1944.

Robert E. Lee In Color

Robert E. Lee shortly after surrendering at Appomattox in 1865.

Curb Market In New York City 1900

Curb Market in New York City circa 1900.

Color Black And White Photos

Aubrey Hepburn in the early 1950s.

Clint Eastwood In 1962

Clint Eastwood in 1962.

D-Day 1944

An overhead photograph of the D-Day landing on Normandy Beach in 1944.

Charles Darwin

Charles Darwin

Booker T. Washington in 1905

Booker T. Washington at Tuskegee University in 1905.

Black and White Photos Lauterbrunnen Switzerland

Lauterbrunnen, Switzerland in 1951.

Aubrey Hepburn In 1953

Aubrey Hepburn In 1953

Albert Einstein In 1921 Photo

Albert Einstein in 1921.

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When The New York City Subway Was The Most Dangerous Place On Earth

The New York City subway of today is what one might lightly call “starkly different” from its predecessors. In the 1980s, over 250 felonies were committed every week in the system, making the New York subway the most dangerous mass transit system in the world. Over the course of a decade, New York public transportation would lose over 300 million riders, largely due to its reputation as a hotbed of crime and drug use. In the gallery below, we take a look at what the New York City subways were like in the 1980s:

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12 Badass Revolutionary War Women You’ve Never Heard Of

The American Revolution was fought on the homefront, which means that women and children were often caught up in the fighting in one way or another. It was their war, too. Remember Rosie the Riveter? She symbolizes the women who worked in the factories and ran the family farms and shops while men were away fighting in WWII.

And there were many women just like Rosie in the Revolutionary War, too. A group of Philadelphia women held the first-ever fundraiser in America; they raised much-needed funds for General George Washington’s Continental Army. Less political wives and mothers even pitched in to sew the army’s uniforms. But some women felt a stronger call of duty; they are the badass women of the Revolutionary War. We begin with a short primer on the art of spycraft in that era.

Then there were the spies, scouts and messengers. Women were useful in that capacity because they were often considered to be above suspicion. Frankly, men of the era usually assumed that women weren’t very bright, which gave them opportunities to listen in on secret meetings. They could also use feminine wiles, disguises, and other ruses to carry out their covert actions. A few members of Gen. Washington’s Culper Spy Ring, operating out of Long Island, were women. Among them were Anna Strong and the unnamed Agent 355. Both names could have come straight out of a James Bond film, but I assure you, this was real life. And death: many historians believe that Agent 355 was caught by the British and died on their fetid prison ship Jersey after giving birth to a son.

Revolutionary War Women Interior Jersey

The interior of the British prison ship Jersey, moored in New York Harbor. Source: WordPress

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The Historic Battle Of Cowpens

Battle Of Cowpens

Outnumbered and out-resourced, the 1781 Battle of Cowpens was an essential win for the American forces during the War of Independence. Continental Army leader Daniel Morgan’s strategy — to weaken, disorganize and trap British forces “by fire” — proved to be successful. Historians would later praise the general for being the only general in American history “to produce a significant original tactical thought”.

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