Rosa Parks Police Report

June 2, 2013

Rosa Parks Police Report

Just goes to show that one’s heroism abroad doesn’t necessarily translate at home. While James F. Blake, the bus driver who filed the complaint against Rosa Parks, served in World War II and fought for the lives and dignity of millions of individuals unjustly persecuted by those with power he couldn’t seem to do the same on his own soil.

Strangely enough, when Blake commented on the 1955 event some years later, he evoked a quasi-Nazi defense: “I wasn’t trying to do anything to that Parks woman except do my job. She was in violation of the city codes, so what was I supposed to do? That damn bus was full and she wouldn’t move back. I had my orders.”

Construction Of France’s Finest Gift To The United States, 1885

May 31, 2013

Statue Of Liberty Construction Paris 1885

Relations between France and the United States may have been a bit terse over the past decade, but if anything is to be emblematic of the common ground between the two nations it’s the Statue of Liberty. Designed by Frédéric Bartholdi and dedicated in October of 1886, the verdigris “Lady” was supposed to serve as the champion of the ideas that Napoleon III suppressed during his reign.

Abraham Lincoln’s Final Trip Home

April 25, 2013

A man of such physical and moral stature couldn’t be bade a final farewell without an equally monumental procession. Commencing on the afternoon of May 1, 1865, Lincoln’s body was transported from Washington DC to his home of Springfield, Illinois by a funeral train that made a point to retrace the route Lincoln took when making his way to his seminal inauguration some years prior. Not present in the funeral train was his wife, Mary Todd, who was too distraught to leave the nation’s capital.

Mapping Out Soviet Fears In America

April 23, 2013

American Regions In Range Of Soviet Submarines

With this map in mind, elementary school “duck and cover” commands that defined the 1960s and the Cold War almost make sense. Almost.

Seven Forgotten American Cult Heroes

April 10, 2013

Forgotten American Cult Heroes: Sam Patch

Before Evel Knievel was a twinkle in his father’s eye, Sam Patch was thrilling audiences across America. As a child laborer in Pawtucket, Rhode Island, Patch would entertain his friends by jumping off the mill dam. By 1827, now living in New Jersey, his increasingly higher jumps had started to attract large crowds. Wanting something more than the life of a mill worker, the 22-year-old Patch began a jumping tour across the then 24-state Union.

“Sam Patch the Yankee Jumper” quickly became a household name, and his catchphrase “Some things can be done as well as others” become popular among his fans. A whopping ten-thousand people came to watch him jump 125 feet from a cliff near the base of Niagara Falls. Shortly after, another eight-thousand came to Rochester, New York to watch him jump the 99 foot Genesee Falls.

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A Brief History Of Hippies

April 4, 2013

In the mid 1960s, a never before seen counter-culture blossomed throughout the United States, inciting both the Flower Power movement as well as the general revulsion of more straight-laced, Ward Cleaver-esque Americans. No longer wanting to keep up with the Joneses or confine themselves to white picket-fenced corrals of repressive and Puritanical sexual norms, these fresh-faced masses would soon come to be known as Hippies.

Originally taken from ‘Hipster’, the term “hippie” was used to describe beatniks who found their technicolor heart in the Haight-Ashbury district of San Francisco; children of the road who believed they should make love, not war. Their vocal opposition to the United States’ involvement in the Vietnam War (1955-1975) and the increasingly rocky road to shared civil rights among all Americans led to this new, alternative form of activism.

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