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21 Shark Facts Just In Time For Shark Week

You’re more likely to be bitten by another person than by a shark, but that hasn’t stopped us from recounting nightmare stories of the ocean’s most talked about predator. Discovery Channel’s annual Shark Week is both a response to and an example of popular interest in one of the world’s most-feared predators.

Hundreds of shark species dart through oceans worldwide, with some being the size of your hand and others larger than a school bus. Even though the fear isn’t that warranted–you’re more likely to be killed by a falling coconut than a great white, after all–the shark’s deftness as a predator warrants media coverage and popular curiosity. So whether you tune into Shark Week or not, wow your friends with these insane shark facts.

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Jigokudani Monkey Park: Where Snow Monkeys Go To Hot Tub

Jigokudani Monkey Park

Source: Pastalert

Everybody loves a hot shower, including these adorable snow monkeys from Japan’s Jigokudani monkey park. Located in the northern part of the Nagano prefecture, the park draws visitors from all over the world. And who can blame them? There’s nothing quite like watching dozens of wild monkeys have a blast in the park’s natural hot springs.

Tourism in Monkey Park

Source: Whizztrip

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What We Love This Week, Volume CXXIII

Mt St Helens Eruption

An ash plume billows from the crater atop Mount St. Helens hours after its eruption began on May 18th, 1980, in Washington state. The column of ash and gas reached 15 miles into the atmosphere, depositing ash across a dozen states. Source: The Atlantic

The Deadliest Volcanic Eruption In United States History, Just 35 Years Ago This Week

Mt St Helens Trees

A wrecked logging truck and crawler tractor are shown amidst ash and downed trees near Mount St. Helens two days after an explosive eruption. Source: The Atlantic

While you’ve surely heard of the eruption of Washington’s Mount St. Helen’s, which occurred 35 years ago this week, what you may not realize was that it was an earthquake that triggered the eruption and a landslide (the largest in recorded history) plus mudslides and floods as well as further eruptions over the following days. The resulting jumble of numbers is staggering: the volcanic blast shot 80,000 feet in the air, lopping 1,300 feet off the top of the mountain, spreading ash across 11 states and 5 Canadian provinces, sparking mudslides that ran for 50 miles, ultimately causing over $1 billion in damage. Experience the devastation at The Atlantic.

Mt St Helens Kiss

Fifteen-year-old Heidi Havens gives Allen Troup, 16, a kiss as he prepares to board a Spokane City bus, on May 27, 1980. Spokane residents had to wear face masks while outside for days after the eruption because of possible health threats from volcanic ash sprayed over the area by Mount St. Helens on May 18. Source: The Atlantic

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Artist Guido Daniele Turns Your Arm Into Your Favorite Animal

Guido Daniele Painting

Source: Poblano

We might regard body painting as a relatively new art form, but in reality it is an ancient practice shared across many cultures. Be it tribal painting rituals, henna tattoos or morning makeup routines, the human body has historically presented itself as an apt canvas for personal expression.

In the West, most of our knowledge on the subject begins and ends with clowns painting animals on kids’ faces at birthday parties. But artists like Guido Daniele take the process to the next level. Daniele doesn’t paint animals on human skin so much as he uses paint to transform people into the animals in question.

Guido Daniele Cheetah

Source: Mo Illusions

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