Photo Of The Day: Japanese Paradise Flycatcher Feeding Its Baby

Japanese Paradise Flycatcher

Image Source: Reddit

The Japanese paradise flycatcher, also called the black paradise flycatcher, is a migratory bird found in many Asian countries including South Korea, Taiwan, and the far north Philippines. Recently, a survey discovered a steep decline in part of the colorful birds’ breeding population, which has presumably occurred because of forest loss and environmental degradation.

Nature Has Never Been This Pretty: This Year’s Wildlife Photographer Of The Year Finalists

Wildlife Photographer Contest

“Snow hare” by Rosamund Macfarlane perfectly captures this mountain hare in the Scottish Cairngorms. Source: Daily Mail

As we start to retire our tank tops and dust the lint off our fall sweaters, the world’s top photography contests are busy announcing their winners. We’ve already seen the top shots from many of the biggest photo competitions, including the Washington Post Traveler, National Geographic Traveler and the Royal Observatory’s Astronomy Photographer of the Year contests. Latest in the lineup is the 2015 Wildlife Photographer of the Year contest, which just announced this year’s finalists.

Zsolt Kudich

Captured by Zsolt Kudich, “Great Egret Awakening” shows a flock of egrets that congregated to feast on stranded fish and amphibians in Hungary. Source: NY Daily News

Photography Andrey Gudkov

Two komodo dragons face off in this incredible image captured by Andrey Gudkov in Indonesia. Source: Guardian


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Photo Of The Day: Buddhist Monk Shares A Meal With A Tiger

Buddhist Monk Feeds Tiger

Image Source: Reddit

Founded in 1994, Wat Pha Luang Ta Bua, a Theravada Buddhist temple in western Thailand, is also known as “Tiger Temple.” This forest temple/animal sanctuary is, in fact, home to many wild animals, the majority of which are Indochinese tigers. As of July 2014, the total number of tigers living at the temple has risen to 135. Though the temple has fallen under scrutiny for years and even been accused of animal mistreatment, Thai officials have found no evidence. In fact, the temple’s monks have established an extraordinarily unique relationship with the nearby tigers, allowing the big cats to freely wander the temple grounds alongside them.

As wild tigers become increasingly rare in the forests of Asia and the very future of the species remains uncertain, the Tiger Temple continues to rescue these majestic beasts.

De-Extinction: The Who, How, When, And Why Of Bringing Extinct Species Back To Life

Mammoth De-Extinction

Image Source: EarthTalk.org

In 1598, the Dutch landed on the island of Mauritius, just off the coast of Madagascar in the Indian Ocean. Here, they were met by a massive population of flightless, naive, meaty birds. Salivating, the sailors happily began killing them, kindly bestowing the name “dodo” upon the shell-shocked animals. Over the next several decades, humans, and the rats, pigs, monkeys and other animals they brought with them, made short work of the small island and the entire species of the dodo, rendering it extinct by 1662.

This isn’t exactly a unique story, as far as extinction goes. Colonizers move in, and the indigenous animal (as well as human and plant) populations begin to dwindle. But, what if we could apologize for our pillaging ways and resurrect these extinct species?

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