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What We Love This Week, Volume CXXVIII

First Color Photo NYC

Mulberry Street, New York Source: Vintage Everyday

The First Color Photographs Of The United States

First Colorized Grand Canyon

The Grand Canyon Source: Vintage Everyday

On some subconscious level, most of us imagine that the world before, say, 1920 existed in black and white. And why not? That’s what the photographic record of the era would have us believe. But as far back as 1889–14 years before the more well-known Autochrome–the Photochrom process was producing color photography. The images here, produced by the Detroit Photographic Company in the late 1800s and early 1900s, are the first color photographs of the United States. From New York to the Rockies to the redwoods, see more of the collection at Vintage Everyday.

Statue Of Liberty Colorized

Sunset from the Battery, New York Source: Vintage Everyday

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What We Love This Week, Volume CXXIII

Mt St Helens Eruption

An ash plume billows from the crater atop Mount St. Helens hours after its eruption began on May 18th, 1980, in Washington state. The column of ash and gas reached 15 miles into the atmosphere, depositing ash across a dozen states. Source: The Atlantic

The Deadliest Volcanic Eruption In United States History, Just 35 Years Ago This Week

Mt St Helens Trees

A wrecked logging truck and crawler tractor are shown amidst ash and downed trees near Mount St. Helens two days after an explosive eruption. Source: The Atlantic

While you’ve surely heard of the eruption of Washington’s Mount St. Helen’s, which occurred 35 years ago this week, what you may not realize was that it was an earthquake that triggered the eruption and a landslide (the largest in recorded history) plus mudslides and floods as well as further eruptions over the following days. The resulting jumble of numbers is staggering: the volcanic blast shot 80,000 feet in the air, lopping 1,300 feet off the top of the mountain, spreading ash across 11 states and 5 Canadian provinces, sparking mudslides that ran for 50 miles, ultimately causing over $1 billion in damage. Experience the devastation at The Atlantic.

Mt St Helens Kiss

Fifteen-year-old Heidi Havens gives Allen Troup, 16, a kiss as he prepares to board a Spokane City bus, on May 27, 1980. Spokane residents had to wear face masks while outside for days after the eruption because of possible health threats from volcanic ash sprayed over the area by Mount St. Helens on May 18. Source: The Atlantic

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Artist Guido Daniele Turns Your Arm Into Your Favorite Animal

Guido Daniele Painting

Source: Poblano

We might regard body painting as a relatively new art form, but in reality it is an ancient practice shared across many cultures. Be it tribal painting rituals, henna tattoos or morning makeup routines, the human body has historically presented itself as an apt canvas for personal expression.

In the West, most of our knowledge on the subject begins and ends with clowns painting animals on kids’ faces at birthday parties. But artists like Guido Daniele take the process to the next level. Daniele doesn’t paint animals on human skin so much as he uses paint to transform people into the animals in question.

Guido Daniele Cheetah

Source: Mo Illusions

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The Violent Ways Humans Have Used Animals As Weapons

War Elephants

Source: Wikimedia

Humans have used animals as weapons for thousands of years. 2,000 years ago, Hannibal led the Carthaginian army riding war elephants to fight Rome. In reply, the Romans set pigs on fire and let them run free through enemy ranks to frighten the elephants.

In World War II, British Special Ops thought of stuffing dead rats with explosives and spreading them throughout Germany. They hoped that the Germans would gather the rats and dispose of them in industrial furnaces, causing explosions powerful enough to trigger catastrophic boiler failures. However, the Brits dropped the plan after their first shipment of explosive rats was intercepted by Nazi forces in 1941.

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