The Batu Caves Add A Rich Tradition Of Hinduism in Malaysia

May 30, 2014
Caves in Malaysia

Source: Wallpapers

Tiptoe up 272 well-marked steps and you’ll reach the Batu Caves of Malaysia. Located north of Kuala in the Gombak district, the Batu Caves attract thousands of Hindu worshipers and visitors each year. While each of the three main caves is astonishing in terms of sheer size and age (the limestone is estimated to be 400 million years old), the religious shrines and statues sprinkled throughout the caves have rendered Batu Caves an important religious site for Hindu followers.

Statue of Lord Murugan Cave Entrance

Source: Deviant Art

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6 Astonishing Asian Structures

May 24, 2014

Petronas Towers, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

The Petronas towers are twin skyscrapers that dot the skyline of Kuala Lumpur. Designed by Argentine-American architect Cesar Pelli, the iconic structure evokes Malaysia’s Islamic culture and heritage of Malaysia and features arabesques, repetitive geometric patterns and an 8-point star formed by intersecting squares.

Asian Structures Petronas Towers Fireworks

Source: Asia Trip

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Hubert Blanz Explores Urban Spaces in Hectic Highway Photos

May 21, 2014
Photos of City From Above

Source: Zeitraumzeit

Anyone who has ever traversed the busy streets of a crowded city will immediately relate to the overwhelming chaos that defines Hubert Blanz’s photography. His artwork is devoid of people, but full of complex architecture. By stacking and manipulating images of roads, homes and cars atop one another, Blanz creates an urban nightmare in which concrete pandemonium reigns. The series, Roadshow, builds upon images of pre-existing roads, intersections, freeways and bridges to create a masterpiece that’s equal parts overwhelming and intriguing.

Roadshow Photographs

Source: Hubert Blanz

Roadshow 4 by Hubert Blanz

Source: Hubert Blanz

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The Many Ghosts Of Bokor Hill Station

May 2, 2014

Perched atop a quaint Cambodian landscape, Bokor Hill Station was once a thriving French resort town where visitors sought solace from the oppressive heat of nearby capital Phnom Penh. Yet after being abandoned twice, all that’s left is a ghost town punctuated by spectral, decaying buildings.

Abandoned City in Cambodia

Source: Wikipedia

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Everything You Need To Know About The Hive-Inn

April 27, 2014
Hive-Inn Hotel

Source: pagesay

Maybe you’ve seen the design plan for Hive-Inn, a spectacular hotel that will be made from shipping containers in a Jenga-like puzzle. Here’s everything you need to know about the innovative design.

1. Hive-Inn Was Designed With Sustainability In Mind

Hive-Inn’s structure is unique, to say the least. Built from recycled shipping containers that can be removed, inserted or rearranged, the proposed Hive-Inn design embodies a building with complete flexibility.

New Innovative Hotel Design

Source: Morfae

2. The New Hotel Designs Embrace The Shipping Container Trend

Like it or not, recycled shipping containers are hot right now. They can be used to make micro-homes, and have been considered as a method for providing housing to poor, overpopulated parts of the world. For designs like Hive-Inn, the shipping containers’ accessibility and uniform size are both key. Otherwise, it would be impossible–physically and financially–to construct such a building.

Advertising Shipping Containers

Source: Fast Company

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Moses Bridge: A Modern Take On The Parting Of The Red Sea

April 21, 2014

Take one glance at how the Moses Bridge divides water and you’ll see where the famous structure gets its name. Although the Moses Bridge is found in the Netherlands–or thousands of miles from where Moses is said to have parted the Red Sea– this architectural wonder provides visitors with an updated spin on the classic tale. Sunken into the middle of a moat, Moses Bridge allows visitors to cross the water on their way to the 17th-century Fort de Roovere, one of many fortresses that was built near the West Brabant Water Line region to prevent French and Spanish invasions.

Bridge Divides Moat Water

Source: Wikipedia

To prevent flooding, a pump at the bottom of the Moses Bridge (also referred to as the Loopgraafbrug or the Trench Bridge) removes water during periods of heavy rainfall. Two dams on either side of the moat also maintain water levels. Designed by architects Ad Kil and Ro Koster, the Moses Bridge allows visitors to get up close and personal with the moat’s water, which laps at the sides for a surreal experience.

Aerial View of Moses Bridge

Source: Flickr

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