Six Modern Buildings You Won’t Believe Are In Tehran

Tehran Architecture Cityscape

Tehran at dusk Source: Flickr

While Iran has seen waves of great political reform–and to some, regression–over the past several decades, both the monarchy and the current republic have used architecture to shape and reflect Iranian identity, especially in its capital city, Tehran. Iranian architecture has a continuous history dating back to 5000 BC and is marked by its cosmic symbolism, inventiveness and geometric balance. During the Pahlavi dynasty, much of the architecture imitated European styles at the risk of losing specifically Persian identity. Since the revolution, architects have migrated toward modern designs fused with Iranian inspiration, particularly in the capital.

The same attention to detail that brought Persepolis to life can still be seen in contemporary Tehran architecture. And while some people may perceive Iran as a country clinging to anachronisms, these six buildings beg to differ. They embrace nature, bring in light and are changing the façade of the largest city in Western Asia:

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7 Spectacular Tiny Homes That Prove Size Doesn’t Matter

7 Amazing Tiny Homes

Source: Daily Mail

Tiny homes are sprouting up all over the world, in both highly urbanized cities and some of the earth’s most remote locales. For some people, the benefits are endless: tiny homes are eco-friendly, cost-effective, and perfect for those who want to start living out and about in the world. Yet for the rest of us, tiny home living sounds adventurous–if not impossible–like we’ve swallowed one too many of Alice’s pills in Wonderland.

Yet for people who are looking to cut costs, today’s tiny homes boast not only a small up-front purchase price, but also cost a lot less to keep going. One tiny home costs just a few thousand dollars to build, and mere dollars to maintain.

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Frank Lloyd Wright Practiced Sustainable Design Before It Was A Movement

In the United States, many conceive of the 20th century as a time when man successfully separated humanity from nature. One of the most obvious examples of this can be found in popular visions of modern architecture. After World War Two, the American economy thrived and suburban development quickly churned out homes to meet nationally increasing demand. And thus the suburbs as we think of them today were born. American city growth continued to expand outside of city centers and by the 1980s, suburbia was not just a growing reality but an ideal destination for many.

But some were uncomfortable with the cost of suburban sprawl. It seemed that homes grew bigger at the risk of habitat destruction and energy waste, while giving way to an aesthetically unpleasing uniformity. Born out of the 1970s environmental movement, contemporary architects have injected the concept of sustainability into their designs, seeking not to use the home to separate people from nature but as a device to re-integrate the two. For these designers, new home plans are focused on native material usage, energy efficiency, recycling and blending nature with human construction. But this isn’t completely a new concept; it’s a rediscovery of earlier principles.

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21 Stunning Photos Of Abandoned Bulgarian Towns

abandoned bulgaria no entry

This former dairy farm looks to have been pulled directly out of a scene from a post-apocalyptic film. The ominous sign on the gate reads “No Entry!”
Source: Bored Panda

As the Soviet Union began to collapse in 1989, Bulgaria entered a new, challenging phase of its development. While the Bulgarian state eventually abandoned communist ideologies for more market-oriented practices, their memory remains in the form of abandoned infrastructure.

These spectral structures stoke the imagination of many, one such person being Bulgarian photographer Hristo Uzunov. From his home base in the Bulgarian capital of Sofia, Uzunov has spent two years drawing out what he calls “The Abandoned Bulgaria” through photos, traveling to more than twenty of these deserted locations to capture their existence, perhaps to remind the nation of its past as knowledge of it recedes from memory.

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