Interesting Architecture On All That Is Interesting

Moses Bridge: A Modern Take On The Parting Of The Red Sea

Take one glance at how the Moses Bridge divides water and you’ll see where the famous structure gets its name. Although the Moses Bridge is found in the Netherlands–or thousands of miles from where Moses is said to have parted the Red Sea– this architectural wonder provides visitors with an updated spin on the classic tale. Sunken into the middle of a moat, Moses Bridge allows visitors to cross the water on their way to the 17th-century Fort de Roovere, one of many fortresses that was built near the West Brabant Water Line region to prevent French and Spanish invasions.

Bridge Divides Moat Water

Source: Wikipedia

To prevent flooding, a pump at the bottom of the Moses Bridge (also referred to as the Loopgraafbrug or the Trench Bridge) removes water during periods of heavy rainfall. Two dams on either side of the moat also maintain water levels. Designed by architects Ad Kil and Ro Koster, the Moses Bridge allows visitors to get up close and personal with the moat’s water, which laps at the sides for a surreal experience.

Aerial View of Moses Bridge

Source: Flickr

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Monstrum Playgrounds, Realizing Children’s Imagination In Wood

Monstrum Playgrounds Transformer

Source: Monstrum

When you’re a child, the whole world is your playground. The tallest of trees in the garden magically transforms into a tree-top tower, and that cardboard box isn’t trash, but a ship destined for the furthest reaches of outer space. But what if you could actually play in a rocket? Danish design firm Monstrum strives to do just that with their playgrounds, bridging the gap between a child’s dream and its physical realization.

Monstrum Playgrounds Mushroom Kingdom

Source: Monstrum

Monstrum Playgrounds Crooked House

Source: Monstrum

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Justin Blinder’s Gentrification GIFs Showcase A NYC In Flux

Flushing Avenue, Brooklyn, NY. Source: Justin Blinder

Flushing Avenue, Brooklyn, NY. Source: Justin Blinder

Most people look to Google Maps to help navigate the present. For Brooklyn-based programmer and designer Justin Blinder, though, Google Maps is an apt device for understanding the past — and potentially the future. Utilizing Maps to showcase the facelift that New York City has received under the Bloomberg administration, Blinder sheds light on gentrification, urban planning, and their implications for some of New York’s oldest neighborhoods.

Gentrification GIFs Bowery

91-93 Bowery Street, New York, NY. Source: Justin Blinder

Blinder made great use of NYC Department of City Planning’s PLUTO dataset to create his Vacated photo project. With that digital storehouse at his fingertips, Blinder successfully scoured for buildings constructed within the past four years and then used Google Street View’s cache to distill years of structural revamping into a single frame.

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