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Video Of The Day: Graffiti In 1970s NYC

Featured above, Norman Mailer’s 1976 short documentary, “Watching My Name Go By,” provides viewers with an inside look at New York City’s 1970s graffiti art scene. We are not only introduced to a few of the local artists, but the people who passionately opposed them and attempted to permanently wipe their work off the streets.

Mailer’s film does a beautiful job of reminding us that graffiti art was not only an outlet for rebellious street artists; it provided the kids with a “sense of identification” in a world where they felt voiceless.

eL Seed Paints Peace Across The Arab World

El Seed Didouche Algeria

eL Seed’s calligraffiti adorns a building in Algiers, the capital and largest city of Algeria. Image Source:

Every day, the media parade negativity across our screens through stories of war, hardship, and murder. Modern artists’ attempts to tackle these issues are often overshadowed by the latest breaking news.

But graffiti is art that cannot be ignored. These large, colorful pieces force overlooked and forgotten messages into the public eye. French-Tunisian artist eL Seed uses calligraffiti–graffiti rendered in calligraphy (in eL Seed’s case, ancient Arabic calligraphy)–to invoke a sense of unity between both individuals and nations, particularly in the Arab/European communities where he often works. No matter where he works, his messages are uniquely related to each place; every Arabic word is painted to create an open dialogue, especially between antagonistic factions, within each community.

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These Dancers Put Your Daily Routine To Shame

Dancers have been drawn, painted, and photographed for as long as they have been around. But just what do they look like when not moving for an audience?

David Perkins presents an answer. The photographer has been snapping shots of dancers for more than a decade, but somewhere along the line found that his job had become less of an opportunity and more like work. The inevitable expenses and hassles of finding studios, lighting, and hair and makeup artists for a shoot had taken their toll. That’s when Perkins decided to photograph dancers in their natural element.

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Banksy Blasts Hollywood, Disney In Latest Prank Installation, “Dismaland”

This isn’t Mickey’s park.

Dismaland, street artist Banksy’s most recent and most elaborate endeavor, contains everything you’d expect to find at an ordinary theme park—a ferris wheel, fair games, rides, and colorful attractions—and yet manages to circumvent any and all semblances of happiness.

Banksy’s theme park opened Saturday, August 22 at a seaside swimming resort in Weston-super-Mare, England. Guests start their Dismaland experience by walking through a security room designed by artist Bill Barminski. Featuring stark white walls and furniture outlined in thick black lines, the space simultaneously conjures images of hospitals and cartoon sets. Once inside the park, apocalyptic attractions—such as a dilapidated castle—and dark art abound.

Bill Barminskyi

Designed by Bill Barminski, the park’s entrance evokes a cartoonish vibe. Source: Huffington Post

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