Can You Color Your Way Out Of Adult Stressors?

Adult Coloring Books Cafe Ellas

Image Source: CaFé CoN eLLaS

Stress (noun, verb):

1. A 21st century illness that flourishes in developed societies.
2. The pressure of having only a few hours a day to finish all that we hope and have to do.

Stress solutions: quit job; change lifestyles; go organic; move abroad without a cellphone; pursue yoga, meditation, tai chi, reiki…

And apparently coloring books.

Yes, you read that correctly. At first it might sound outlandish that adults are reverting to “toys” in order to cope with the stresses that each day brings, but in northern Europe coloring for adults is already a major trend. In the United States, the concept is in bloom.

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Vintage Vogue Covers: When Fashion Lacked Photoshop

Vintage Vogue Covers Shadow Lead

Source: Miss Moss

High fashion of course existed before the camera, which means that illustrations graced the covers of Vogue magazine well before airbrushed models and celebrities did. While the 1894-founded magazine was one of fashion photography’s primary points of origin, in the days preceding the fashion photo, Vogue relied on expertly-crafted illustrations to promote Vogue founder Arthur Turnure’s goal: celebrating and encouraging the “ceremonial side of life” in a country that did not value class or ceremony as much as its Western European counterparts.

Given the magazine’s lofty goals, the illustrated covers had to be as technically immaculate as they were artistically inspired: each hand-drawn Vogue cover was a masterful art nouveau and deco piece in its own right, and featured a technical precision as impressive as the fashions and lifestyles that the illustrations promoted. What’s more, where today’s Vogue can be recognized by its unyielding all-caps title, back in the day the magazine’s typeface changed with almost every cover to fit each different illustration.

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Video Of The Day: Graffiti In 1970s NYC

Featured above, Norman Mailer’s 1976 short documentary, “Watching My Name Go By,” provides viewers with an inside look at New York City’s 1970s graffiti art scene. We are not only introduced to a few of the local artists, but the people who passionately opposed them and attempted to permanently wipe their work off the streets.

Mailer’s film does a beautiful job of reminding us that graffiti art was not only an outlet for rebellious street artists; it provided the kids with a “sense of identification” in a world where they felt voiceless.

eL Seed Paints Peace Across The Arab World

El Seed Didouche Algeria

eL Seed’s calligraffiti adorns a building in Algiers, the capital and largest city of Algeria. Image Source: elseed-art.com

Every day, the media parade negativity across our screens through stories of war, hardship, and murder. Modern artists’ attempts to tackle these issues are often overshadowed by the latest breaking news.

But graffiti is art that cannot be ignored. These large, colorful pieces force overlooked and forgotten messages into the public eye. French-Tunisian artist eL Seed uses calligraffiti–graffiti rendered in calligraphy (in eL Seed’s case, ancient Arabic calligraphy)–to invoke a sense of unity between both individuals and nations, particularly in the Arab/European communities where he often works. No matter where he works, his messages are uniquely related to each place; every Arabic word is painted to create an open dialogue, especially between antagonistic factions, within each community.

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