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What We Love This Week, Volume CXXIV

Realistic Masks Homer Simpson

A participant of the traditional dirty pig festival wearing a Homer Simpson mask wallows in a slough near Hergisdorf, Germany, on May 25, 2015. Source: The Atlantic

Arresting Masks From Around The World

Scary Mask Devil Krampus

A man dressed as a devil performs during a Krampus show in the southern Bohemian town of Kaplice on December 13, 2014. Each year people in traditional costumes and masks parade through the streets to perform an old ritual to disperse the ghosts of winter. Source: The Atlantic

Come Halloween, masks are products of commerce and pop culture, used for both horror and humor. But apart from Halloween–and especially in many countries beyond our borders–masks remain rooted in tradition and folkways, used for both celebration and protest. In Burundi, a mask made from a giant leaf protests presidential term limits. In Spain, bull horns and a burlap sack epitomize the revelry of Carnival. In America, Batman leads the charge for wage increases. See the masks–sad, scary, surprising and strange–of China, Bohemia, Slovenia and more at The Atlantic.

Tony Abbott Mask G20

A protester, wearing a mask depicting Australian Prime Minister Tony Abbott, and dressed as a surf lifesaver calls for global equality among nations among other protesters outside the venue site of the annual G20 leaders summit in Brisbane, on November 14, 2014. Source: The Atlantic

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What We Love This Week, Volume CXXIII

Mt St Helens Eruption

An ash plume billows from the crater atop Mount St. Helens hours after its eruption began on May 18th, 1980, in Washington state. The column of ash and gas reached 15 miles into the atmosphere, depositing ash across a dozen states. Source: The Atlantic

The Deadliest Volcanic Eruption In United States History, Just 35 Years Ago This Week

Mt St Helens Trees

A wrecked logging truck and crawler tractor are shown amidst ash and downed trees near Mount St. Helens two days after an explosive eruption. Source: The Atlantic

While you’ve surely heard of the eruption of Washington’s Mount St. Helen’s, which occurred 35 years ago this week, what you may not realize was that it was an earthquake that triggered the eruption and a landslide (the largest in recorded history) plus mudslides and floods as well as further eruptions over the following days. The resulting jumble of numbers is staggering: the volcanic blast shot 80,000 feet in the air, lopping 1,300 feet off the top of the mountain, spreading ash across 11 states and 5 Canadian provinces, sparking mudslides that ran for 50 miles, ultimately causing over $1 billion in damage. Experience the devastation at The Atlantic.

Mt St Helens Kiss

Fifteen-year-old Heidi Havens gives Allen Troup, 16, a kiss as he prepares to board a Spokane City bus, on May 27, 1980. Spokane residents had to wear face masks while outside for days after the eruption because of possible health threats from volcanic ash sprayed over the area by Mount St. Helens on May 18. Source: The Atlantic

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Artist Guido Daniele Turns Your Arm Into Your Favorite Animal

Guido Daniele Painting

Source: Poblano

We might regard body painting as a relatively new art form, but in reality it is an ancient practice shared across many cultures. Be it tribal painting rituals, henna tattoos or morning makeup routines, the human body has historically presented itself as an apt canvas for personal expression.

In the West, most of our knowledge on the subject begins and ends with clowns painting animals on kids’ faces at birthday parties. But artists like Guido Daniele take the process to the next level. Daniele doesn’t paint animals on human skin so much as he uses paint to transform people into the animals in question.

Guido Daniele Cheetah

Source: Mo Illusions

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Stunning Images Of An “Urban Ice Age” Highlight Humanity’s Smallness

ice age artist spires

Architectural spires break through the surface, almost as if they are coming up for air Source: Huffington Post

Whether you believe it’s plausible or not, French artist Francois Ronsiaux wants us to imagine a world in which the ice caps have melted, drowning our urban spaces–and to internalize the ramifications. This is the goal of his solemn, haunting and humbling series, United Land.

ice age artist sharks

Sharks dance at the opera house Source: Huffington Post

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