The True Size Of Australia

July 4, 2014

True Size Of Australia

For most people, Australia is simply out of sight and out of mind. But when you compare the nearly three-million square mile country to other regions–like this GIF does–it’s a lot harder to ignore.

Meet “Cloud”, A Speaker And Lamp That Looks Exactly Like A Thundercloud

July 1, 2014

Don’t come home to escape the storm? Then this lamp is just for you. Made by Richard Clarkson Studio, the lamp-speaker combo features a motion detector that triggers thunder and lightning the minute you walk into the room. Moody and broody types, rejoice!

Torino Dazzles At Dusk

June 30, 2014

Turin Italy

The northern city of Turin–or Torino in Italian–has a rich, regal heritage. The nation’s first capital city in 1861, it was also home to the House of Savoy, or Italy’s royal family. By World War II, its influence had begun to fade. Today, the city still has a significant economic impact, and is home to some of the country’s most prestigious universities.

Painted Typography That Will Blow Your Mind

June 28, 2014

It would be hard to explain Pawel Nolbert’s painted typography to a friend. The images flaunt characteristics of a painting—brushstrokes, paint drips and sometimes even the paint canisters themselves—and yet they the painted typography images from Nolbert’s Atypical series are mixed-media masterpieces unlike anything you have ever seen before.

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Poplar Trees Light Up Northern Oregon

June 26, 2014
Poplar Trees Northern Oregon

Source: 500PX

Growing quickly and dying relatively young, the poplar tree is the James Dean of trees. What’s with the name? Back in Roman times, the trees were frequently planted around public–or popular–meeting places, giving rise to its scientific genus name of Populus.

The Gorgeous Contours Of Antelope Canyon

June 24, 2014

Antelope Canyon Arizona

Don’t let “127 Hours” scare you; slot canyons can be pure beauty. Case in point: Arizona’s Antelope Canyon. At first blush, its Navajo name, Tsé bighánlílíní or “the place where water runs through rocks” doesn’t make sense given the barren backdrop. But upon looking at its geological history and discovering that the canyon was primarily formed due to flash flooding-induced erosion, the Navajo name makes worlds more sense than its contemporary English one.