Carl Jara Uses Sand In Ways You’ve Never Seen Before

June 8, 2014

Master sand-sculptor Carl Jara showcases his broad imagination and attention to detail in each of his wondrous sand creations. A far cry from your average sandcastle, creating these epic sculptures is a major undertaking. Massive amounts of sand (obviously), large structural support objects, and big rig trucks to supply the large amounts of water are needed throughout the sculpting process. Along with actually transferring an artist’s vision unto billions of grains of sand, it’s no surprise that it takes nearly three whole days to complete a competition sculpture.

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Clement Briend’s Surreal Projections

May 27, 2014
Briend Portrait

Source: Vice

Most photographers are content with capturing reality, but French photographer Clement Briend prefers to create them. As part of a two-step creative process, Briend modifies large, photo-quality format projectors to adjust light flow, then carefully chooses both a surface and an image to project upon it. His most famous example to date is the “Cambodian Trees” installation, where Briend brought Cambodian deities to life during a Phnom Penh festival. With their likenesses cast upon the trees amid urban sprawl, the twilight incarnation of these cultural figures gives these photos a very surreal quality.

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A Unique Animated Short Film Made Entirely With Post It Notes

May 26, 2014

Post-it notes don’t have to serve as repositories for recording all of your daily drudgeries. As evidenced by this remarkable short film, they have positive, creative potential, too.

Fictitious Dishes for Book Lovers and Foodies Alike

May 25, 2014
Photographs of Meals from Books

“The kettle soon began to boil, and meanwhile the old man held a large piece of cheese on a long iron fork over the fire, turning it round and round till it was toasted a nice golden color on each side.” Heidi. Source: NPR

Dinah Fried still remembers reading about the gooey cheese-covered toast in Heidi as a young kid. In fact, she feels most proud of the photographs that capture and recreate meals from her favorite childhood literature. The Fictitious Dishes project is a spectacular, heartwarming nod to over two centuries of food and literature. Fit for both bibliophiles and foodies alike, the photo book renders into reality meals from our favorite stories.

Moby Dick Fictitious Dishes

“It was made of small juicy clams, scarcely bigger than hazelnuts, mixed with pounded ship biscuit, and salted pork cut up into little flakes; the whole enriched with butter, and plentifully seasoned with pepper and salt.” Moby-Dick. Source: NPR

Fictitious Dishes and Madelines

“She sent out for one of those short, plump little cakes called petites madeleines, which look as though they had been moulded in the fluted scallop of a pilgrim’s shell.” Swan’s Way. Source: Idea Stream


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Technicolor Alaska

May 22, 2014

When we think of Alaska, “technicolor” isn’t likely to be one of the first words to come to mind. But every so often, the chilly state’s night skies become a canvas to one of the world’s most brilliant natural phenomena, the northern lights. If you can’t manage to make it to Fairbanks to see them for yourself, this video is a good substitute.

To learn more about the Northern Lights, check out our post on them!

Insightful Animated Short Examines Racism As An Acquired Epidemic

May 20, 2014

From film creators Shimi Asresay and Hili Noy:

“The peaceful daily routine of father and son is interrupted by an encounter of an unfamiliar boy, different from them in color. An allegory to the phenomena of racism as an acquired cultural epidemic, the story discusses the question of the personal conscience of each of us, versus the education we receive from our families and environment. Can we really insist on our personal belief system, when what we must believe in, is dictated to us?

The film presents how easily we acquire fear and hatred of foreigners, as well as how easily we might become the “strangers” and “others” ourselves.”