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Adolf Hitler Had This Photo Of Himself Banned

Banned Picture Of Hitler

Even génocidaires have standards, apparently. In the 1930s, Adolf Hitler had publication of this photo (and others like it) banned because he considered it “beneath one’s dignity.”

How did these photos surface, then? In 1945, an Allied soldier named Alf Robinson found a tattered, coverless book in a bomb-blasted house in Germany, and added it to his collection of Nazi relics, according to reports. It turns out that the book was more or less a propagandistic Nazi party “fanzine” called Deutschland Erwache (Germany Awaken), and written by Baldur von Schirach in the 1930s.

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Seoul Sparkles At Night

It’s truly a “miracle” that Seoul, South Korea looks the way it does today: following the destruction brought on by the Korean War, the “Miracle on the Han River” catapulted the country…

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How Muzak Shaped A Conformist America

Muzak Vintage Ad Woman

Source: Flickr

Although it might be easier to ignore in an age where nearly ever American carries thousands of songs in their pocket, the unmistakable sound of Muzak still haunts us all. An estimated 100 million people (nearly a third of America’s population) are exposed to Muzak’s background music each day, whether in an elevator, on hold with the cable company or elsewhere. Although the Muzak brand technically went bankrupt in 2009 and lost its name in 2013 after new owners moved in, its technology set the stage for almost a century of bland, instrumental music that became the soundtrack to postwar America and continues to this day.

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Seven of Russia’s Most Spectacular Churches

St. Basil's Red Square Moscow

Source: Flickr

Despite decades of Soviet atheism, Russia remains a deeply religious country. Part of that devotion expresses itself in vibrant displays of faith. The saints of Russian icons, for example, look almost like sci-fi sages, wearing gold-trimmed, hooded robes, flashing mystical gang signs, and backlit by orange-orb haloes. By design, they are otherworldly.

The same is true of Russian churches. Their architecture trumpets the existence of a realm beyond this earth. For tens of millions of Russian devotees, these houses of prayer and worship are a link to that supernatural world, which is still a very real presence in their lives, as it was for their forbearers.

Here are seven of the most stunning examples of Russian religious architecture. These churches sprout across the wastelands of the former Soviet empire like flowers in the snow.

1. Trinity Lavra of St. Sergius in Sergiyev Posad

Trinity Lavra of St. Sergius

Source: Flickr

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What We Love This Week, Volume CXXXV

Archtoyanie Sculpture Dancing Girl

Image Source: Smithsonian

Inside Russia’s Surreal Summer Sculpture Festival

Archtoyanie Sculptures Towers

Image Source: Smithsonian

It started with an army of snowmen. From there, Russian artist Nikolay Polissky moved on to a castle made of firewood and a 50-foot lighthouse made of branches. Soon, he launched the Archstoyanie festival and drew other artists and architects to the small town to the quiet, rural Kaluga region. But with over 40,000 visiting the sculptures of Polissky and company last year, the region is becoming a little less sedate. Given the fascinatingly surreal character of the festival’s sculptures and installations, it’s no surprise that more and more are flocking to Kaluga. See for yourself at Smithsonian.

Archtoyanie Sculptures Towers Light

Image Source: Smithsonian

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