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A Dwarf Documents His Life And Interactions With Others In New York City

Jonathan Novick gives us a rare insight into dwarfism–and not the kind of “rare insights” that appear nightly on TLC–in this short-length documentary, “Don’t Look Down on Me”. Novick has been living in the city for a little over a year now, and while the experience has been good in general, some of the encounters he’s had have been incredibly frustrating. With the help of a button cam, he shows us how.

The Macabre Sculptures Within The Bone Church

If you happen to venture into the Czech Republic’s small suburb of Sedlec, you may stumble upon the Cemetery Church of All Saints. The structure itself looks fairly unassuming, but the outer walls contain some creepy indications of the ghastly findings you are about to encounter inside – actually, less so inside than underneath.

Tucked beneath the small Roman Catholic chapel is the Sedlec Ossuary, which is essentially an enormous mausoleum estimated to hold the remains of between 40,000 and 70,000 dead people. Charming, yes? The vast majority of the deceased met their demise in the 14th and 15th centuries after obviously unsuccessful encounters with the black plague and the Hussite wars. Just the thought of dealing with that many corpses is shudder-worthy on its own, but there’s more … many of the inhabitants’ remains have been used to build giant bone sculptures within the ossuary’s underground walls. Is this pragmatism at its finest?

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Moscow, The 1957 Host Of The World Festival Of Youth And Students

World Festival Youth And Students 1957 Moscow

Organized by the World Federation of Democratic Youth and the International Union of Students, the sixth festival held in Moscow drew the highest number of attendees–34,000 people from 130 countries–ever.

This was the first time the Soviet Union had opened its doors to such an event, and that was only made possible due to what is now known as Nikki Khrushchev’s “Thaw”, a period when he began to permit foreigners to visit and interact (albeit while supervised) with natives.

Music and musicians from all around the world congregated here, and would do so relatively frequently in Socialist countries, seeing as massive amounts of expenditures were needed to successfully carry out youth festivals of this size. Interestingly enough–and perhaps one of the more subtle, lingering reasons why some conservatives dislike festivals today–by the 1960s the US State Department had accused these festivals of being a tool of radical politics and Communist propaganda. Open dialogue, it seems, is a bad thing.

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