Monstrum Playgrounds, Realizing Children’s Imagination In Wood

March 12, 2014
Monstrum Playgrounds Transformer

Source: Monstrum

When you’re a child, the whole world is your playground. The tallest of trees in the garden magically transforms into a tree-top tower, and that cardboard box isn’t trash, but a ship destined for the furthest reaches of outer space. But what if you could actually play in a rocket? Danish design firm Monstrum strives to do just that with their playgrounds, bridging the gap between a child’s dream and its physical realization.

Monstrum Playgrounds Mushroom Kingdom

Source: Monstrum

Monstrum Playgrounds Crooked House

Source: Monstrum

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Lucy McRae: Blurring The Lines Between Art, Technology And The Human Form

March 8, 2014
Lucy McRae Evolution Image

Source: Lucy McRae

Few artistic subjects are more fascinating than the human body, and few artists are more talented than Lucy McRae, who works in the space where fashion, technology and the human form overlap. Ditching the restrictive titles that she could easily claim—artist, architect, thinker—Lucy McRae prefers to call herself a Body Architect. Much of McRae’s work takes the natural human silhouette, distorts it, and then recreates that image for an entirely different effect.

Gold Sequins Covering Human Body

Source: Grey Aviary

Man Covered in Grass

Source: Lucy McRae

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What We Love This Week, Volume LV

March 7, 2014
Carnival Brazil

Source: The Atlantic

Carnival Around The World

Carnival Mud

Source: The Atlantic

We may still be in the throes of a global economic slowdown, but the decadence-drenched carnivals seen around the world this week beg a different story. In Rio de Janeiro, for example, nearly one million tourists–along with its six million residents–took to the streets in a glorious testament to hedonism…err, the Lord. The Atlantic has a fantastic spread to catch you up to speed.

Carnival Reveler

Source: The Atlantic

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5 Ways 3D Printing Will Change The World

March 6, 2014

While 3D printing seems well suited in the plot of a futuristic sci-fi novel, it is well within our grasp. Using a variety of materials that includes wood, metal, plastics and fabrics, we are now able to print various three-dimensional objects, ranging from food, spare parts, weapons, homes, organs, medical devices, clothing and more. Yet what effect will these present capabilities have on our future? We uncover five important ways 3D printing will change the world.

1. 3D printing can end world hunger.

3D Printed Food

Source: Engineering

We’ve all been there: making food sounds like too much of a hassle, yet buying it seems equally oppressive. While this age-old issue has plagued us for decades, three-dimensional printing now offers a viable alternative. Say you’re craving a deep dish pizza. Instead of calling the delivery guy, you just choose your pizza and toppings and print the deep dish pie from the comfort of your home—Seriously, NASA recently granted Systems & Materials Research Corporation $125,000 to develop a pizza printer.

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The World’s Most Incredible Toothpick Art

March 6, 2014

True artists have a way of seeing the world and its many facets in a light that escapes most others’ eyes. For San Francisco-born artists Steven J. Backman and Scott Weaver, this alternate view led them to utilize the toothpick not for oral hygiene but art. From micro sculptures made from a single toothpick to sprawling scenes composed of over 100,000 of them, their toothpick art is distinct, impressive and sure to please.

Rolling through the Bay Toothpick Sculpture

Source: Art-Spire

Scott Weaver: The Artist Behind “Rolling Through the Bay”

In the United States, wooden toothpicks are fashioned from pliable, porous birch wood, though in other locations they are derived from various wood or artificial materials like plastic. When creating his San Francisco sculpture “Rolling Through the Bay,” toothpick artist Scott Weaver took a more international approach, using toothpicks brought to him by friends and family members from all over the world. The giant abstract sculpture took more than 3,000 hours over 34 years (and 100,000 toothpicks!) to create.

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Meet 4-Year-Old Mayhem, The World’s Cutest Fashion Designer

February 27, 2014

Meet “Mayhem,” the world’s cutest four-year-old fashion designer in training. Along with mom Angie (who gave her the incredible nickname Mayhem), this kiddo has been creating paper dresses, outfits and out-of-this-world costumes for the past nine months. Angie has documented the entire fashion progression on their Instagram account and under the hashtag #fashionbymayhem.

4-Year-Old Mayhem's First Design

Mayhem’s very first paper dress. Source: Instagram

FashionbyMayhem as Jennifer Lawrence

Source: BuzzFeed

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