What We Love This Week, Volume XXVIII

Day To Night In The World’s Most Iconic Cities

Movement in the world’s most populous cities never stops, and neither should the photographic exposure of it. Not content with capturing these dynamic metropolises at a single moment in time, it was not uncommon for photographer Stephen Wilkes to spend around 15 hours a day shooting 1,500 of the same subject (so around 100 photos per hour, or a little under two photos per minute). Wilkes’ project took him all the way from DC to Jerusalem to Shanghai; for more stunning shots, head over to The Daily Mail.

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Mirror City’s Kaleidoscopic Views

In Carl Sagan’s “Pale Blue Dot”, he remarks frequently on what an alien might glean about humans if it were to visit Earth. Sagan thought that one of the alien’s most salient take aways would be our obsession with geometry and symmetry. In “Mirror City,” a time-lapse of the United States’ greatest cities from Chicago to San Diego, the creator takes that obsession to a kaleidoscopic and entrancing new level.

Amsterdam From Above

Aerial View Of Amsterdam

Besides forming an aesthetically appealing design, Amsterdam’s canals served a more functional purpose as they provided an apt means of defense, transportation and water development. Crafted at the height of immigration in the 17th century, city planners developed a canal-based organizational system comprising four concentric half-circles, three of which were used solely for residential development. Unfortunately, the original plans have been lost so historians are left to speculate the original drafters’ intentions.

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