A Brutal End For Brutalism?

Brutalism Building

Hubert H. Humphrey Building, headquarters of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Washington, D. C. Image Source: Wikipedia

It seems there hasn’t been a more reviled architectural style in the past century than Brutalism.

Thirty years back, when Prince Charles of Wales – Brutalist enemy number one – paid a visit to the Birmingham Library, he purportedly likened it to a place where books are burned rather than put on loan. In 1987, in his Mansion House speech, Charles said that he valued post-war architecture less than the rubble left in the aftermath of Luftwaffe air raids.

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Reject The Plan: The Defiant Curves Of The Ordos Museum

In 2011, MAD architects commenced a project to build a museum in Ordos, China. Located in inner Mongolia, architects conceived of the museum’s design as a reaction to the rigidity imposed by master plans.

Learn more about the building’s lines of defiance in the architectural firm’s description below:

Conceived as a reaction to the strict geometry of the master plan, the Art & City museum by MAD Architects is an amorphous building that seems like it has landed on the earth. Its surrounding dunes, monumental stairways and belvederes have been generated from the empty Gobi desert which was here just a few years ago.

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Life Inside A Tiny Parisian Apartment

What would you be willing to put up with in order to live in Paris? Maybe several flights of stairs and a living space about the size of a large closet? If that’s the case, then this diminutive domicile is just for you. With an area of only 86 square feet, this is without a doubt one of the tiniest homes in Paris. And yet, it’s entirely functional. Which is to say, its size scarcity won’t lead you to the brink of insanity and then push you over the edge.

Take a tour of the petite abode with Kitoko Studio, the masterminds behind the apartment’s functionality-minded renovation, and see if this sort of lifestyle is for you.

Robert Bruno’s Home With A Snout

For most of us, a 23-year project sounds more like a punishment than it does an opportunity to explore your creativity. And yet for architect Robert Bruno, that’s exactly what his steel house is. Located in Lubbock, Texas, the former sculptor began making his home in 1973, adding layers bit by bit for nearly two and a half decades.

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