One Russian Billionaire’s Crazy Expensive Yacht

May 22, 2014

Adorned with three luxurious pools and thousands of fancy fixtures, Andrey Melnichenko’s crazy expensive yacht is so opulent that it would make even Caligula blush. Like Madonna and Beyonce, the “A” yacht is so spectacular that it was given a one-word moniker. The beautiful boat—which some say looks more like a submarine than a luxury liner—set Russian billionaire Melnichenko back a staggering 300 million dollars. The result is a fully customized floating paradise, complete with bath knobs that cost a reported 40 thousand dollars—each. For comparison’s sake, that could also pay around two years of Harvard tuition fees.

Andrey Melnichenko

Billionaire Andrey Melnichenko, Source: Famous Wiki

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31 Beautifully Abandoned Soviet Monuments

May 20, 2014

While Francis Fukuyama so cheerily declared that the world had reached “the end of history” in 1992, he was only half right. True, the Soviet Union and its ideological model had collapsed, and the Western model of liberal democracy had prevailed. However, even as ideas come and go, the structures in which we house them tend to take a bit longer to disappear.

Such is the case with the monuments scattered across the former Soviet Union. Before its dissolution, the Soviet Union had an area of 8.65 million square miles, filled with approximately 290 million people. While these abandoned Soviet monuments have succumbed to time and the elements, they remind us of the transformative and lasting power of ideas.

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Abandoned Soviet Monuments Zimnitsa

A communist statue in the tiny town of Zimnitsa, Bulgaria.

Abandoned Soviet Monuments Pillars

Niš, Serbia.

Abandoned Soviet Monuments Spikes

Kosmaj, Serbia.

Abandoned Soviet Monuments Dome

Kruševo, Macedonia.

Abandoned Soviet Monuments Tree

Jasenovac, Croatia.

Abandoned Soviet Monuments Dilapidated

Košute, Croatia.

Abandoned Soviet Monuments Graffiti

Sanski Most, Bosnia and Herzegovina.

Abandoned Soviet Monuments Angle

Ostra, Romania.

Abandoned Soviet Monuments Opening

Tjentište, Bosnia and Herzegovina.

Abandoned Soviet Monuments Spomenik

Petrova Gora, Croatia.

Abandoned Soviet Monuments Beams

Brezovica, Kosovo.

Abandoned Soviet Monuments Sharp

Kolašin, Montenegro.

Abandoned Soviet Monuments Star

Zenica, Bosnia and Herzegovina.

Abandoned Soviet Monuments Stone

Tjentište, Bosnia and Herzegovina.

Abandoned Soviet Monuments Boards

Makljen, Bosnia and Herzegovina.

Abandoned Soviet Monuments Popped

Mitrovica, Kosovo.

Abandoned Soviet Monuments Cube

Ilirska Bistrica, Slovenia.

Abandoned Soviet Monuments Triangles

Korenica, Croatia.

Abandoned Soviet Monuments Circle

Nikšić, Montenegro.

Abandoned Soviet Monuments Tower

Kozara, Bosnia and Herzegovina.

Abandoned Soviet Monuments Landing

Sinj, Croatia.

Abandoned Soviet Monuments Sunburst

Kadinjača, Serbia.

Abandoned Soviet Monuments Hollow

Grmeč, Bosnia and Herzegovina.

Abandoned Soviet Monuments Wings

Podgarić, Croatia.

Abandoned Soviet Monuments Buzludzha Hill

The area outside Buzludzha, Bulgaria

Abandoned Soviet Monuments Shumen

Shumen monument, Bulgaria.

Abandoned Soviet Monuments Soldiers

Russian soldiers facing Moscow. Varna, Bulgaria.

Abandoned Soviet Monuments Man

Monument to 1300 Years of Bulgaria, in the city of Shumen.

Abandoned Soviet Monuments Stairs

Monument of the Bulgarian-Soviet Friendship, Varna, Bulgaria.

Abandoned Soviet Monuments Geometry

Inside the Plovdiv Hillock of Fraternity, Bulgaria.

Abandoned Soviet Monuments Buzludzha

Buzludzha Communist Party Headquarters, Bulgaria.

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The Stunning Ruins Of Villa Epecuén, A Modern Day Atlantis

May 18, 2014
Saltwater Flood in Villa Epecuén

Source: The Atlantic

As humans, we are mesmerized by ruins, inherently intrigued by the concrete skeletons of old buildings and towns that are now rendered useless and abandoned. In the case of Villa Epecuén—a thriving resort town has since been reduced to a salty puddle—these ruins offer us an understanding of how quickly a town’s landscape can transform and be reduced to nothing.

Saltwater Laps at Concrete Ruins

Source: The Atlantic

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Severija Incirauskaite’s Innovative Cross-Stitch Metal Art

May 5, 2014
Cross-Stitch Metal After Party

Source: Goooood

Lithuanian-born Severija Incirauskaite is one of those artists that makes people appreciate creativity and innovation. This talented textile artist embroiders ordinary objects like pails and spoons, transforming them from cheap metal into multi-faceted, mixed-media artwork. While Incirauskaite’s methods are fairly traditional—most of our grandparents were cross-stitching before this woman was born—the finished product is anything but ordinary.

Cross-Stitch Metal Spoons

Source: Cauprotuplem

Severija Incirauskaite

Source: YNot? Blog

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Everything You Need To Know About The Hive-Inn

April 27, 2014
Hive-Inn Hotel

Source: pagesay

Maybe you’ve seen the design plan for Hive-Inn, a spectacular hotel that will be made from shipping containers in a Jenga-like puzzle. Here’s everything you need to know about the innovative design.

1. Hive-Inn Was Designed With Sustainability In Mind

Hive-Inn’s structure is unique, to say the least. Built from recycled shipping containers that can be removed, inserted or rearranged, the proposed Hive-Inn design embodies a building with complete flexibility.

New Innovative Hotel Design

Source: Morfae

2. The New Hotel Designs Embrace The Shipping Container Trend

Like it or not, recycled shipping containers are hot right now. They can be used to make micro-homes, and have been considered as a method for providing housing to poor, overpopulated parts of the world. For designs like Hive-Inn, the shipping containers’ accessibility and uniform size are both key. Otherwise, it would be impossible–physically and financially–to construct such a building.

Advertising Shipping Containers

Source: Fast Company

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Moses Bridge: A Modern Take On The Parting Of The Red Sea

April 21, 2014

Take one glance at how the Moses Bridge divides water and you’ll see where the famous structure gets its name. Although the Moses Bridge is found in the Netherlands–or thousands of miles from where Moses is said to have parted the Red Sea– this architectural wonder provides visitors with an updated spin on the classic tale. Sunken into the middle of a moat, Moses Bridge allows visitors to cross the water on their way to the 17th-century Fort de Roovere, one of many fortresses that was built near the West Brabant Water Line region to prevent French and Spanish invasions.

Bridge Divides Moat Water

Source: Wikipedia

To prevent flooding, a pump at the bottom of the Moses Bridge (also referred to as the Loopgraafbrug or the Trench Bridge) removes water during periods of heavy rainfall. Two dams on either side of the moat also maintain water levels. Designed by architects Ad Kil and Ro Koster, the Moses Bridge allows visitors to get up close and personal with the moat’s water, which laps at the sides for a surreal experience.

Aerial View of Moses Bridge

Source: Flickr

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