The Stunning Ruins Of Villa Epecuén, A Modern Day Atlantis

Saltwater Flood in Villa Epecuén

Source: The Atlantic

As humans, we are mesmerized by ruins, inherently intrigued by the concrete skeletons of old buildings and towns that are now rendered useless and abandoned. In the case of Villa Epecuén—a thriving resort town has since been reduced to a salty puddle—these ruins offer us an understanding of how quickly a town’s landscape can transform and be reduced to nothing.

Saltwater Laps at Concrete Ruins

Source: The Atlantic

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Everything You Need To Know About The Hive-Inn

Hive-Inn Hotel

Source: pagesay

Maybe you’ve seen the design plan for Hive-Inn, a spectacular hotel that will be made from shipping containers in a Jenga-like puzzle. Here’s everything you need to know about the innovative design.

1. Hive-Inn Was Designed With Sustainability In Mind

Hive-Inn’s structure is unique, to say the least. Built from recycled shipping containers that can be removed, inserted or rearranged, the proposed Hive-Inn design embodies a building with complete flexibility.

New Innovative Hotel Design

Source: Morfae

2. The New Hotel Designs Embrace The Shipping Container Trend

Like it or not, recycled shipping containers are hot right now. They can be used to make micro-homes, and have been considered as a method for providing housing to poor, overpopulated parts of the world. For designs like Hive-Inn, the shipping containers’ accessibility and uniform size are both key. Otherwise, it would be impossible–physically and financially–to construct such a building.

Advertising Shipping Containers

Source: Fast Company

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Moses Bridge: A Modern Take On The Parting Of The Red Sea

Take one glance at how the Moses Bridge divides water and you’ll see where the famous structure gets its name. Although the Moses Bridge is found in the Netherlands–or thousands of miles from where Moses is said to have parted the Red Sea– this architectural wonder provides visitors with an updated spin on the classic tale. Sunken into the middle of a moat, Moses Bridge allows visitors to cross the water on their way to the 17th-century Fort de Roovere, one of many fortresses that was built near the West Brabant Water Line region to prevent French and Spanish invasions.

Bridge Divides Moat Water

Source: Wikipedia

To prevent flooding, a pump at the bottom of the Moses Bridge (also referred to as the Loopgraafbrug or the Trench Bridge) removes water during periods of heavy rainfall. Two dams on either side of the moat also maintain water levels. Designed by architects Ad Kil and Ro Koster, the Moses Bridge allows visitors to get up close and personal with the moat’s water, which laps at the sides for a surreal experience.

Aerial View of Moses Bridge

Source: Flickr

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