10 Things You Didn’t Know About Charles Darwin

Perhaps no theory today is better known—or more controversial—than the theory of evolution. And we have one man to thank for that: Charles Darwin. Darwin wrote The Origin of Species, one of the most influential scientific works of all time that also paved the way for modern biology. But there is a lot more to the man himself.

1. He was born on February 12, 1809. In and of itself, this is not particularly noteworthy, but Darwin does share his birthday with another prominent historical figure – Abraham Lincoln.

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Emily Post: The Beyoncé Of Etiquette And The Internet’s Most Underused Asset

Emily Post Cher

Cher could have learned a lot from Emily Post. Source: Time


The modern world can seem very rude. Take a gander at the comments section of any blog or stroll around a playground and you’ll likely hear some despicable things from the mouths of babes. You might shrug it off, not wanting to sound like your grandma who is notoriously nostalgic for “the good old days”, in spite of how bad they were for a number of people.

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31 Stunning Photos Of Imperial Russia In Color

One of the largest empires of the world was the mighty Russian Empire that thrived from 1720 until 1917. It stretched across three continents, encompassed diverse lands and people, and crushed Napoleon when he was reckless enough to attempt to conquer it. The October Revolution of 1917 would put an end to imperial Russia but two photographers, Sergey Prokudin-Gorsky and Piotr Vedenisov, managed to capture life before the revolution, and they did it in full color.

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Imperial Russia In Color

Caption: Sergey Prokudin-Gorsky was born in Vladimir Oblast, Russia in 1863. Combining his work in chemistry with art, he pioneered color photography by taking three photos in succession through red, green and blue filters that would become a composite color photo. Source: Wikimedia

Imperial Russia In Color Tolstoy

Gorsky’s photo of Leo Tolstoy would gain him fame among the royals, and he would soon receive funding to document Russia in color for Tsar Nicholas II from 1909 to 1915. Source: Wikimedia

Imperial Russia In Color Girls

Gorsky’s work captured the diversity of the Russian Empire’s citizens, from rural peasants to royalty. Source: Wikimedia

Imperial Russia In Color Inmates

A zindan, or prison, in Bukhara, of modern day Uzbekistan. Zindans were typically built underground. Source: Wikimedia

Imperial Russia In Color Dagestan

A couple wearing traditional clothing poses for Gorsky in Dagestan. Source: English Russia

Imperial Russia In Color Krygyz

Gorsky was granted special access to restricted areas of the Empire. Here, he photographs a nomadic Kyrgyz family on the steppe. Source: Wikimedia

Imperial Russia In Color Jewish Teacher

A Jewish teacher instructs his students in Samarkand, an intellectual and economic hub on the Silk Road. Samarkand is a highly diverse city, home to Tajiks, Persians, Arabs, Jews and Russians. Source: Wikimedia

Imperial Russia In Color Children

Russian children relax on a hillside near White Lake, in northern European Russia. Source: Wikimedia

Imperial Russia In Color Emir Khan

Shortly after his rise to power, Emir Khan of Bukhara posed for a portrait for Gorsky. Bukhara was a vassal state of the Russian Empire in Islamic Central Asia. The emir fled to Afghanistan after the Red Army sacked the city and abolished his dynasty. Source: Wikimedia

Imperial Russia In Color Storks

Gorsky captures storks building a nest on what is most likely a mosque in Bukhara. Source: Wikimedia

Imperial Russia In Color Fabric Merchant

A fabric merchant poses among his wares on the Silk Road, which stretched from China and India to Central Asia, the Middle East and the Mediterranean. Source: Tmora

Imperial Russia In Color Sulyukta Mines

Gorsky documents travelers with their camels near Sulukta in modern day Kyrgyzstan. Source: Tmora

Imperial Russia In Color Camp

Gorsky catches himself in this photo on the right in 1912 at Chusovaya. Source: Kuriositas

Imperial Russia In Color Camel

A Turkmen man crouches with camel laden with packs in Central Asia. Source: Blogspot

Imperial Russia In Color Ukraine

A young girl in traditional garb poses in what was referred to as Little Russia, now known as Ukraine. Source: Blogspot

Imperial Russia In Color Church

Gorsky also catalogued buildings, houses and nature for his project, including this church in Nyrob. Source: Blogspot

Imperial Russia In Color Monastery

The Assumption Monastery in Pereiaslavl-Zalesskii display the peaked domes common in Russian church construction. Source: Blogspot

Imperial Russia In Color Mosque

View of the Shakh-I Zindeh mosque in Samarkand as the sun sets. Currently, just over 11% of Russians identify as Muslim. Source: Blogspot

Imperial Russia In Color Head Study

Gorsky also photographed members of upper class society. Source: Wikimedia

Imperial Russia In Color Uzbek Woman

Sart woman wearing a paranja in Samarkand, which is now part of Uzbekistan. Source: Public Domain

Imperial Russia In Color Artists

Gorsky sits to the right of two guards for the Murmansk railway. Source: Wikimedia

Imperial Russia In Color Man Robe

A bureaucrat in Bukhara poses in a brightly colored robe for Gorsky. Source: Magic Mouse

Imperial Russia In Color Caucasus

A Kurdish mother sits with her children in Artvin, now part of northeastern Turkey. Source: Trash Russia

Imperial Russia In Color Georgian Woman

A Georgian woman dressed in regal attire poses on a rug in the forest. Source: Trash Russia

Imperial Russia In Color Samarkand Man

Gorsky had the ability to capture both the strength and vulnerability of the peasant class without being judgmental. His photos are an eye-opening glimpse into an empire on the verge of revolution and war. Source: Trash Russia

Imperial Russia In Color Table

Peter Vedenisov was a pianist with an interest in color photography. He made color autochromes on glass that he could project onto a wall. Source: English Russia

Imperial Russia In Color Kosakov Daughter

Vedenisov worked primarily with aristocratic families, particularly the Kosakovs, and managed to capture a different style of life from the peasants of the Russian Empire. Source: English Russia

Imperial Russia In Color Kosakov Family

The Kosakovs were friends of the Vedenisovs. Here, the women and children of the family pose. Source: English Russia

Imperial Russia In Color Patriarch

A Crimean patriarch sits for a photo, wearing an eye patch. Source: English Russia

Imperial Russia In Color Crimean Woman

A Crimean woman of wealth poses in a garden, surrounded by opulent flowers. Source: English Russia

Imperial Russia In Color Yalta

Vedenisov lived for years in Yalta and captured pictures of ships in the port. A resort town, Yalta sits in Crimea, a now disputed area of Ukraine. Source: English Russia

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The 1918 Flu Pandemic: History In Photos

1918 Flu Pandemic Table Fold

Source: CNN

According to the numbers provided by the U.S. Department of Justice, over five million souls died in WWI, excluding prisoners of war or missing persons. This is admittedly an incredibly high number, but it pales in comparison to the estimated 50 to 100 million more people the world over who lost their lives to the especially virulent influenza pandemic of 1918.

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