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5 Extreme Protests You Won’t Believe

Extreme Protests Kent State

Source: Slate

In a way, every major event in history can be reduced to a tale of power struggle and protest. Successful protests have struck down reprehensible policies like Apartheid, and brought attention to previously unknown issues like the many missing indigenous women in Canada. The extreme protests featured here cover a wide array of issues in different ways. From disturbing public art displays to physical backlashes, these protests shocked the world for a number of reasons. And once you learn about them, you’ll find them difficult to forget.

Kent State, Ohio

Urban Outfitters Kent State

Source: WDSU

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4 Bizarre Festivals That Prove Human Eccentricities Know No Limits

Every now and then, people like to get together as a collective unit and engage in excessive and generally questionable behavior. These events are usually known as festivals. Oftentimes, festivals are great opportunities to showcase local culture and traditions. The thing with local culture, though, is that it can appear quite strange to outsiders who simply “don’t get it”. But as the following festivals suggest, the confusion is entirely warranted.

El Colacho

Bizarre Festivals Colacho Jump

Best Adidas commercial ever
Source: The Guardian

Celebrated during the Corpus Christi feast near Burgos, Spain, this festival is known internationally by another name: baby jumping. The concept is relatively simple: mattresses are draped along the village’s main road. Babies are placed on those mattresses and then, naturally, men jump over them. Easy peasy!

Bizarre Festivals Top Down

Something to tell your therapist in 20 years
Source: Linkiesta

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How War Changed Abraham Lincoln

First And Last Portrait Abraham Lincoln President

Beginning his term as president three months after South Carolina became the first state to secede from the Union, it is impossible to know if Abraham Lincoln could foresee the pure carnage that awaited him and the nation. Over 600,000 deaths later, the war’s effects are plainly seen on Lincoln’s face.

How Photojournalism Killed Kevin Carter

Warning: some photos in this article are graphic and disturbing.

Kevin Carter Vulture Photo

Kevin Carter’s most famous photo Source: The Unsolicited Opinion

When this photograph capturing the suffering of the Sudanese famine was published in the New York Times on March 26, 1993, the reader reaction was intense and not all positive. Some people said that Kevin Carter, the photojournalist who took this photo, was inhumane, that he should have dropped his camera to run to the little girl’s aid. The controversy only grew when, a few months later, he won the Pulitzer Prize for the photo. By the end of July, 1994, he was dead.

Kevin Carter Trash Can Lid

Photojournalist Guy Adams took this shot of Carter during township violence; behind him, a man uses a trash can lid as a shield Source: Miko Photo

Emotional detachment allowed Carter and other photojournalists to witness countless tragedies and continue the job. The world’s intense reactions to the vulture photo appeared to be punishment for this necessary trait. Later, it became painfully clear that he hadn’t been detached at all. He had been deeply, fatally affected by the horrors he had witnessed.

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