Vietnam Veterans Rail Against War In 1976

It was Douglas MacArthur who so aptly described the veteran condition when he wrote that “the soldier above all others prays for peace, for it is the soldier who must suffer and bear the deepest wounds and scars of war”. Perhaps in an attempt to allow their own scars to heal and prevent even more from etching themselves onto their bodies, these Vietnam veterans took to the streets of Philadelphia in protest of future deadly ventures in which they would merely serve as interchangeable pawns in a game of bloody rivalry.

In Russia, Supersonic Planes Can Be Found In Your Backyard

Abandoned Supersonic Plane Russia

OK, so two caveats: it’s an abandoned supersonic TU-144, and it’s part of the Sinsheim Auto & Technik Museum, not a backyard per se. Like the Concorde, this supersonic plane’s use was short-lived, as the plane underwent a violent dive, eventually crashing, destroying 15 homes and killing 14 people total.

5 Sunken Ships That Are More Interesting Than The Titanic

For a significant chunk of human history, maritime domination was of utmost concern for the world’s leading powers. As the saying went, he who ruled the seas ruled the world. Given the constraints of existing technology, water was really the only viable method of covering long distances from one continent to another. Obviously, this led to many conflicts among nations, and more than a few ships found their ways to a watery grave. Some of these shipwrecks have since been recovered and transformed into spots for historical study or recreation.

HMHS Britannic

For better or worse, everyone’s already heard of the Titanic, which is why it’s been left off the list. That’s not likely the case for its sister ship, the Britannic. This ship was actually built by the same company as the Titanic – the White Star Line. The Britannic was constructed after the sinking of the “unsinkable” Titanic so, obviously, some changes had to be made in order to make it stand up to its reputation. A few extra lifeboats plus a reinforced hull around the boiler room, engine room and other regions vulnerable to icebergs made for smart additions.

Sunken Ships Britannic Front

Admit it, you were thinking of that scene in Titanic Source: Gallery Hip

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30 Rockefeller Center, 1933

30 Rockefeller Center 1933

Had the stock market not crashed in 1929, there is a high likelihood that we would associate Rockefeller Center with an ornate opera house, not an ice skating rink. When John D. Rockefeller Jr. leased the space from Columbia University, he initially intended to build a Metropolitan Opera House on site, but financing troubles meant that he essentially would have to construct the building on his own.

Completed in 1939, Rockefeller Center’s construction was considered the largest private building project of modern times and one that employed a whopping 40,000 people in its nine-year development process. Interestingly enough, this private operation eventually became the site of a number of public agents like British Intelligence and the British Security Coordination, who occupied the space during World War Two.

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