These Are The Very First Movie Sequel, Remake, And Reboots Ever

The very first movie sequel, remake, and reboot are all much older than you think. Most may not realize it, but Hollywood has been cashing in on all three for a long, long time.

Outlaw Godzilla Klansman

Everyone has either heard complaints or complained themselves about Hollywood’s seemingly overwhelming wave of sequels, remakes, and reboots. And that complaint is almost always informed by the notion that Hollywood is running out of creative fuel.

The truth, however, is altogether simpler and more black-and-white: Hollywood is a business, and sequels, remakes, and reboots are an especially bankable part of that business. In fact, the third and fourth highest grossing films of all-time — Star Wars: The Force Awakens and Jurassic World, which have combined to gross over $3.5 billion — are both reboots/sequels, and both were released as recently as 2015.

But what too few realize is that this is nothing new. Because they’re so bankable, Hollywood has always been awash in sequels, remakes, and reboots.

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The Peace Corps: Celebrating 55 Years of Service

55 years ago today, JFK established an organization to win the Cold War not just through weaponry, but relationships: the Peace Corps.

Peace Corps Ghana Sign

55 years ago, in 1961, this sign pointed toward the location of the new Peace Corps’ office in Ghana, the first country where Peace Corps volunteers served. Source: National Museum of American History

Today, Barack Obama tweeted the Peace Corps, wishing it a happy 55th birthday. While almost all countries have an army, marine corps or civil engineer engineer corps, the United States also has what it calls a Peace Corps – an organization dedicated to advancing international relationships between citizens of the U.S. and other countries through service.

On March 1, 1961, 55 years ago today, President Kennedy signed Executive Order 10924 and established the Peace Corps. It would be an entirely new kind of organization. Instead of sending money or machinery to help countries in need, the Peace Corps would send American citizens with nothing more than their own knowledge, skills, and eagerness to contribute to a greater good. Here’s what that looks like — and has looked like — in practice:

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Peace Corps Sign Post

For the last 55 years, over 220,000 U.S. Peace Corps volunteers have served in 140 countries around the world. Photo source: Elvert Barnes

Peace Corps Rose Garden

President Kennedy sends off the first batch of Peace Corps volunteers with a Rose Garden speech. This 1961 group would serve in Ghana and Tanganyika (now Tanzania). Photo source: John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum

Peace Corps Sargent Shriver

President Kennedy hands his pen to Sargent Shriver, the first Peace Corps Director, after signing the Peace Corps Bill into law in September 1961. Photo source: John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum

Peace Corps Ida Shoatz

One of the hundreds of Americans to volunteer for the Peace Corps during the Kennedy presidency, Ida Shoatz served in Peru by running a school lunch program for villages in the Andes mountains. Photo source: John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum

Peace Corps Arthur Young

Another of that first batch of Peace Corps volunteers, Arthur Young, interacts with a tractor driver in rural Tanganyika (now Tanzania). Photo source: John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum

Peace Corps Older Volunteers

While PCVs are generally young -- the average age today is 28 -- the Peace Corps has always welcomed older volunteers into its ranks. Here, President Kennedy greets some PCVs in their 60s and 70s about to start their service in Peru. Photo source: Library of Congress

Peace Corps Lillian Carter

In 1966, Lillian Carter, mother of future-President Jimmy Carter, joined the Peace Corps at the age of 68. She worked with people suffering from leprosy in India. Photo source: Peace Corps

Peace Corps World Map

This is a map of where Peace Corps volunteers were serving circa 1966. Photo source: Library of Congress

Peace Corps Book Box

PCVs spend a lot of time reading books. In this photo from 1962, the first Peace Corp Director, Sargent Shriver, displays a case of books that the agency was sending out to volunteers. Photo source: John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum

Peace Corps Kenneth Baer

From the beginning, teaching has been a core service area for the Peace Corps. In this photo, PCV Kenneth Baer teaches English in Ghana in the early 1960s. Photo source: Library of Congress

Peace Corps Malaysia Teacher

Here, PCV Paul Van Der Werf sits with colleagues and students at his service site in Malaysia in the mid-1960s. Paul is the guy in the shades. Photo source: Flickr

Peace Corps Volunteer Indonesia

In a similar scene about 50 years later, Peace Corps volunteer Matt Borden poses for a photo with his colleagues and students at his site in Indonesia. Photo source: Matt Borden

Peace Corps Chalk Board

And this is what Matt’s classroom looks like. Photo source: Matt Borden

Peace Corps Math Class

PCVs serve in a variety of teaching roles. This volunteer in Malawi is teaching an advanced math class. Photo source: Peace Corps

Peace Corps Volunteer Senegal

A Peace Corps Volunteer connects with members in his community in Senegal. Photo source: Barry Pousman

Peace Corps Jamaica Neighborhood

PCVs live in the communities where they serve. This is what one neighborhood looked like for a PCV serving in Jamaica. Photo source: Justin Leonard

Peace Corps Bed Net

This is where one volunteer sleeps in Ecuador. It’s a fairly typical scene as PCV living arrangements go. Photo source: Peace Corps

Peace Corps Indonesia Site

A volunteer’s site in Indonesia might look like this. Photo source: Matt Borden

Peace Corps Kenya Commute

Or in Kenya a PCV's commute to work might look like this. Photo source: Flickr

Peace Corps Ethiopia Mountains

Or this, in Ethiopia. Photo source: Peace Corps

Peace Corps Romania Snow

Not all PCVs serve in hot, tropical climates. This shot comes from near a volunteer’s site in Romania in 2000. Photo source: Flickr

Peace Corps Tree Planting

At present, close to 7,000 Peace Corps volunteers are working alongside local partners around the world. This photo comes from a tree planting day at a high school at a Peace Corps site in Senegal. Photo source: Dorothy Voorhees

Peace Corps Tanzania Farming

On the other side of the African continent, PCV Bill Flexner works on an agricultural project with local partners in Tanzania. Photo source: Flickr

Peace Corps Ethiopia Farming

Peace Corps volunteers have been doing this kind of work for a while. Here’s a volunteer in Ethiopia in 1973. Photo source: Peace Corps

Peace Corps Philippines Map

The agency is an ongoing point of connection and friendship for U.S. citizens and citizens from countries around the world. Photo source: Peace Corps

Peace Corps Flags Legacy

55 years after its founding, the U.S. Peace Corps continues to be one of the most powerful legacies of the Kennedy presidency. Photo source: Flickr

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The True Story Behind Leap Year Proves We’re Just Making Up Time As We Go Along

We take our calendar for granted. We generally act as if it’s fixed, infallible, one with the Sun — a true guide to what time it is. Then, every four years, February 29 comes around to remind us that not only is the calendar simply a fallible human invention, but a pretty clumsy, ultimately inaccurate one at that. From the ten days that vanished from October 1582 to the fact that leap year doesn’t actually happen every four years, this look at the origins of leap year proves time isn’t what we think it is.

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Photo Of The Day: The Original Ronald McDonald Is Unrecognizable — And Terrifying

Original Ronald Mcdonald

The original Ronald McDonald. You probably don’t want fries with that. Image Source: Imgur

McDonald’s has had some memorable fiascos in their 60-plus-year reign as fast food king, but it seems the people behind the Golden Arches always find a way to regroup and return even stronger than before. And this is especially true of the face of the business himself: Ronald McDonald.

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