34 Splendid Photos Of Salvador Dali Being Salvador Dali

Like ballerinas, Salvador Dali was simultaneously an artist and a work of art. When not piecing together some of the most out-there, psychedelic portraits known to man, Dali did the same with his public persona. His classic, occasionally nonsensical one liners like “I don’t do drugs; I am drugs” have gone down in history, along with photos of him walking an anteater and, naturally, shaping his inimitable mustache into a dollar bill.

As with other surrealists, Salvador Dali embraced the irrational and bizarre as his truths, digging deep into our unconscious selves only to splash his findings onto the canvas. Such a movement was not unforeseen: in the eyes of surrealists, it was cold, rational calculation that led to conflict, war and alienation seen in the 20th century. If we were to survive as a people, we needed to reject this artificial and harmful way of thinking about the world; we had to look inward as opposed to outward. In other words, you guessed it, we needed to ditch realism for surrealism. And as the following photos show, Dali did that in all facets of his life:

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Dali Kahlo

With Frida Kahlo

Salvador Dali Warhol

With Andy Warhol

Salvador Dali Alice Cooper

With Alice Cooper

Salvador Dali Sabina Nore

With Sabina Nore

Salvador Dali Francoise Hardy

With Francoise Hardy

Salvador Dali St. Laurent

With Yves St. Laurent

In a technical sense, Dali and his contemporaries were unsuccessful in altering the world’s consciousness, but their work–as complex as it is absurd–is an invaluable artistic challenge to the chilly realism that largely defined the 20th century. For more on surrealism, check out our post on the most iconic surrealist paintings.

All images come from Tumblr.

How War Changed Abraham Lincoln

First And Last Portrait Abraham Lincoln President

Beginning his term as president three months after South Carolina became the first state to secede from the Union, it is impossible to know if Abraham Lincoln could foresee the pure carnage that awaited him and the nation. Over 600,000 deaths later, the war’s effects are plainly seen on Lincoln’s face.

How Photojournalism Killed Kevin Carter

Warning: some photos in this article are graphic and disturbing.

Kevin Carter Vulture Photo

Kevin Carter’s most famous photo Source: The Unsolicited Opinion

When this photograph capturing the suffering of the Sudanese famine was published in the New York Times on March 26, 1993, the reader reaction was intense and not all positive. Some people said that Kevin Carter, the photojournalist who took this photo, was inhumane, that he should have dropped his camera to run to the little girl’s aid. The controversy only grew when, a few months later, he won the Pulitzer Prize for the photo. By the end of July, 1994, he was dead.

Kevin Carter Trash Can Lid

Photojournalist Guy Adams took this shot of Carter during township violence; behind him, a man uses a trash can lid as a shield Source: Miko Photo

Emotional detachment allowed Carter and other photojournalists to witness countless tragedies and continue the job. The world’s intense reactions to the vulture photo appeared to be punishment for this necessary trait. Later, it became painfully clear that he hadn’t been detached at all. He had been deeply, fatally affected by the horrors he had witnessed.

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We’ll Miss You, Joan Rivers

Comedian Joan Rivers passed away yesterday after complications arose during a medical procedure. Never one to mince her words or hold her punches, she will be sorely missed. In honor of Joan’s wry, unapologetic sense of humor, here are some wholly inappropriate quotes, and some of her best stand-up routines.

We Miss You Joan Rivers Quote

Source: NRP


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