Here’s How People Attempted To Deny Women The Right To Vote

As the 2016 election draws closer and Hillary Clinton gets her chance to become America’s first female president, it’s easy to — as Michelle Obama recently noted — “take for granted that a woman can be president of the United States.”

But there was a time, not even 100 years ago, that a woman simply voting for president seemed like a pipe dream. It wasn’t until 1920 that women in the United States were given the right to vote — and even that came only after decades of agitation and activism.

Those activists, suffragettes, were not simply up against a prejudiced legal system, but — as the following vintage posters show — a culture unready to grant women greater rights.

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Woman Suffrage Memorabilia

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Woman Suffrage Memorabilia

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Woman Suffrage Memorabilia

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Flickr/Scrappy Annie

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Woman Suffrage Memorabilia

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Woman Suffrage Memorabilia

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Woman Suffrage Memorabilia

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Woman Suffrage Memorabilia

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Woman Suffrage Memorabilia

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Woman Suffrage Memorabilia

412px I_did_not_raise_my_girl_to_be_a_voter3

Wikimedia Commons

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What Louis Armstrong Learned About Politics During His Middle East Tours

The photo of Louis Armstrong playing his trumpet before the Giza pyramids is iconic — the story behind it, however, is chaotic.

(FILES) Picture Shows American Jazzman L

AFP/Getty ImagesLouis Armstrong

The U.S. government has done much over the years to warrant the suspicion and paranoia of international political leaders, but in the late ’50s and early ’60s, Egyptian President Gamal Abdel Nasser took that paranoia to celestial heights when he accused renowned trumpeter Louis Armstrong of being a spy — and using his “scat” singing to pass secret messages to other spies in the Middle East.

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The Most Intense Remarks Fidel Castro Ever Made

A successful revolution hinges on not just how you wage war, but how you wield words. Fidel Castro — whose rhetoric helped turn the island of Cuba against its democratically-elected government — is a living testament to that.

Castro, who held control over Cuba for half a century, is not known for his pithiness. Indeed, over the course of his life he has often given three-hour speeches, and will answer a simple “yes” or “no” question with an entire defense of the impoverished and a searing indictment of capitalism.

Still, rhetoric is not reality. The latter finally set in for the Cuban people in the 1970s, when Cuba became the poorest nation in the Soviet bloc, plagued with disease and totalitarianism. The revolution came, thanks in part to Castro’s words, but it did not produce the paradise about which Castro waxed poetically.

With that in mind, here’s a handful of the most intense Fidel Castro quotes you’ll ever read:

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On the revolution's rewards:

Fidel Castro Quotes

Jorge Rey/Getty Images“One of the greatest benefits of the Revolution is that even our prostitutes are college graduates.” - 2003, to director Oliver Stone in the documentary Comandante

On Santa Claus:

Santa In Ny

Kena Betancur/Getty Images"The leading symbol of the hagiography of US mercantilism." - 1998

On his similarity to Jesus Christ:

Jesus Communism Mural

THOMAS COEX/AFP/Getty Images“I never saw a contradiction between the ideas that sustain me and the ideas of that symbol, of that extraordinary figure, Jesus Christ.” - 1985

On capitalism and poverty:

Poverty In La

Mario Tama/Getty Images"Capitalism has neither the capacity, nor the morality, nor the ethics to solve the problems of poverty." - 1991

On revolution:

Socialism Or Death

ADALBERTO ROQUE/AFP/GettyImages“A revolution is a struggle to the death between the future and the past." - 1961, speech on the second anniversary of the Cuban Revolution

On his use of violence:

Fidel Speech

ADALBERTO ROQUE/AFP/Getty Images“Condemn me, it does not matter: history will absolve me.” - 1953, at his trial for the raid on Moncada Barracks

On George W. Bush:

George W Bush

Spencer Platt/Getty Images"For a country that can read, write and think, no one can make a more eloquent criticism of the empire than Bush himself." - 2008

On George W. Bush, again:

Fidel Waving Flag

ADALBERTO ROQUE/AFP/Getty Images"You cannot utter the word democracy, because, among other reasons, everyone in the world knows your ascent to the US presidency was a fraud." - 2004

On Jeb Bush:

Jeb Bush

Sean Rayford/Getty Images"Forgive me for using the term 'fat little brother' ... It is not a criticism, rather a suggestion that he do some exercises and go on a diet, don't you think? I'm doing this for the gentleman's health." - 2005

On his beard:

Fidel With Beard

ISMAEL FRANCISCO/AFP/Getty Images“I’m not thinking to cut my beard, because … my beard means many things to my country. When we have fulfilled our promise of good government, I will cut my beard.” - 1959 interview with CBS, 30 days after the start of the Revolution

On the future of US-Cuba relations:

Obama Pope

JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images"United States will come to talk to us when they have a black president and the world has a Latin American pope." - 1973

On religion:

Righteous Fidel Lights

JUAN MABROMATA/AFP/Getty Images“If people call me Christian, not from the standpoint of religion but from the standpoint of social vision, I declare that I am a Christian.” - 2007

On his health:

Stoic Fidel Profile

ADALBERTO ROQUE/AFP/Getty Images"I have a heart of steel.” - 1972, in response to journalists asking about his heart condition

On combatting imperialism:

Angry Fidel Pointing

MIGUEL ROJO/AFP/Getty Images“I propose the immediate launching of a nuclear strike on the United States. The Cuban people are prepared to sacrifice themselves for the cause of the destruction of imperialism and the victory of world revolution.” - 1992

On a good speech:

Defeated Fidel

ADALBERTO ROQUE/AFP/Getty Images"I have concluded – maybe a little late – that speeches must be short." - 2000

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