A Native American Woman Operates A Switchboard In 1925

Native American Switchboard

Following decades of forced removal and ethnic cleansing on behalf of the US government, by the time the 20th century rolled around most indigenous North Americans were living west of the Mississippi River, and in much smaller numbers. As a further means of social control, though, in 1898 the federal government made it its goal to assimilate indigenous peoples into Euro-American society, which essentially meant that tribal governments, religions and customs were outlawed. The photo seen here was likely staged, meant to represent the convergence of two worlds: the exotic Indian meets modern “civilization”. As for the odd marks on the woman’s hand, it’s likely smallpox scars.

A Brief History Of Crossdressing

crossdressing rupaul

Source: NY Post

Humans are designed to compartmentalize objects, ideas, and experiences. It’s how we survive. Our early ancestors’ ability to instantaneously decide a whether a situation was safe or dangerous was imperative if they wanted to keep their weak, hairless little bodies alive long enough to pass along their genes.

As societies developed, understanding our place within that structure, as well as everyone else’s, became just as important. We wanted to look at somebody and immediately know certain things about them (namely, were they trying to have sex with us, and were we trying to have sex with them). We would use visual cues to gather information about a person and tailor our behavior accordingly.
Continue Reading

North Brother Island Is New York’s Best Kept Secret

Christopher Payne North Brother Island

Source: Smithsonian

As with many forgotten places, few people—even New York locals—know that North Brother Island exists. While the island was once home to the famed Typhoid Mary, it has since been overtaken by Mother Nature’s gentle yet unyielding hand. A dot on the East River that’s nestled between Bronx and Rikers Island, North Brother Island is now like the world’s other abandoned locales: overrun with lush trees, ivy and tall grasses, a mere shadow of its former self.

New York From Brother Islands

Source: Smithsonian

Abandoned Island New York City

Source: Slate

Continue Reading

Vietnam Veterans Rail Against War In 1976

It was Douglas MacArthur who so aptly described the veteran condition when he wrote that “the soldier above all others prays for peace, for it is the soldier who must suffer and bear the deepest wounds and scars of war”. Perhaps in an attempt to allow their own scars to heal and prevent even more from etching themselves onto their bodies, these Vietnam veterans took to the streets of Philadelphia in protest of future deadly ventures in which they would merely serve as interchangeable pawns in a game of bloody rivalry.

Close Pop-in
Like All That Is Interesting

Get The Most Fascinating Content On The Web In Your Facebook & Twitter Feeds