What We Love This Week, Volume CXXXII

Boats Pollen Lake Ripples

Sailboats move through the pollen-covered water of Lake Starnberg near Starnberg, Germany. Source: The Atlantic

Awe-Inspiring Aerial Photography

Winding River Sunlight Reflection

The Amazon wends through Peru’s Loreto region. Source: The Atlantic

Revealing angles and patterns we’d never otherwise see, aerial photography offers a striking perspective that is at once majestic and humbling, orderly and chaotic. Glimpsed from far above, we not only focus on the forest, as it were, instead of just the trees, we realize that the trees belong to forests we didn’t even know were there. From high in the sky, the Amazon becomes a snake slithering through the grass while an Egyptian pyramid becomes a rock in a sandbox. Find out what becomes of the rest of our world as seen from above at The Atlantic.

A hot-air balloon flies over the outskirts of Minsk, Belarus as part of the Second Annual Aeronautics Championship. Source: The Atlantic

A hot-air balloon flies over the outskirts of Minsk, Belarus as part of the Second Annual Aeronautics Championship. Source: The Atlantic

Continue Reading

Iceland’s Economic Upswing Is A Lesson To Us All

Iceland's Economic Upswing Sun

“Why are the banks considered to be the holy churches of the modern economy? Why are private banks not like airlines and telecommunication companies and allowed to go bankrupt if they have been run in an irresponsible way? The theory that you have to bail out banks is a theory that you allow bankers enjoy for their own profit, their success, and then let ordinary people bear their failure through taxes and austerity. 
People in enlightened democracies are not going to accept that in the long run.” -Icelandic President Ólafur Ragnar Grímsson
Source:WordPress

In 2008 when the United States and most of Europe decided to bail out the banks instead of allowing them to fail, Iceland chose a different path. As their entire banking system collapsed, the small nation of 320,000 opted to forgive mortgage debt, and began rebuilding from scratch. The country isn’t out of the woods yet, but today they are politically and financially stable. The current unemployment rate is down to 5%–better than in Great Britain or the United States (both 6%), and much lower than Spain (26%), Ireland (11%), and Greece (30%). Clearly this is a multi-layered issue, and what works in one small, largely homogeneous nation might not work in a large, diverse one like the United States, but perhaps punishing–not rewarding–the people responsible for the collapse was the correct course of action after all.

Close Pop-in
Like All That Is Interesting

Get The Most Fascinating Content On The Web In Your Facebook & Twitter Feeds