What War? Twentieth Century Japan’s Views Of The Future Were Impossibly Bright

Imagine a world where robots reared your children, and wars were waged underwater. Add a splash of nostalgia, a touch of Jules Verne and super-saturated hues, and you’ve got the “future” according to Japanese retro-futurists. The movement roughly spanned from the 1930s to the 1960s, which covered a series of protracted conflicts and transitions for the island nation. And while none of the futurists’ depictions of reality actually came into being, we can’t help but revel in the way technological innovations can inform views on what the world has to offer.

Propeller powered trains, 1936: Could be seen as a forerunner to the high speed rail systems in use today in metropolitan areas around the world.

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January In Japan

In case you’re feeling the need to get out of town in winter’s darkest hour (and we can’t say we blame you), this video may make you consider hopping a flight to…

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Tokyo From Above

Tokyo Aerial Photograph

One of the 47 prefectures of Japan, the most populous metropolitan area in the world almost looks serene from this vantage point.

10 Terrifyingly Beautiful Storm Satellite Images

Storm Satellite Images Moving

Source: NOLA

Although hurricane season usually peaks around mid-September, more than a handful of monstrous hurricanes, storms and cyclones have formed during October 2014. Bringing with them torrential rain and swift winds, the storms have touched almost every corner of the world. Check out these 10 terrifyingly beautiful storm satellite images that prove that Mother Nature is not a force to be reckoned with.

Super Typhoon Vongfong

Super Typhoon Vongfong from Space

Source: NBC News

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The Ghosts Of Fukushima In Namie, Japan

Namie Japan Ghost Town

Nearly swallowed whole by a major earthquake, tsunami, and nuclear radiation, the town of Namie is struggling to survive. Three years later, Namie remains within the clutches of natural disaster–and likely will for the foreseeable future. The town’s 20,000-plus residents are still evacuated due to persistently high radiation levels, and it is likely that even when they do recede those forced to leave will remain negatively affected by the slew of disasters for the rest of their lives.

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