What We Loved This Week, Jan. 24 – 30

The astounding tattoo art of Japan’s most feared gangs, Chinese monsters made of paper, family photos from the world’s wealthiest and most dangerous crime lord, Americans reveal why they own guns, and incredible panda facts and photos.

Pablo Escobar Family

Image Source: www.vintag.es

Rarely Photos Of Pablo Escobar As A “Normal” Family Man

Pablo Escobar Family

Image Source: www.vintag.es

When you’re nicknamed “The King of Cocaine,” most wouldn’t expect you to live a normal life. And it is well known that the infamous Colombian drug lord Pablo Escobar did not lead a conventional life. In fact, he’s often cited as the wealthiest criminal in history. But the man who was known to have killed thousands to rise in the drug trade was also a family man, and as these surprising photographs, courtesy of Vintage Everday reveal.

Pablo Escobar Family

Image Source: www.vintag.es

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Beyond The Bedroom: The Surprising History Of Prostitution Around The World

The complex history of prostitution around the world reveals where and when prostitutes offered way more than sex. Perhaps the United States could learn a thing or two from these countries.

In the eyes of most, the modern sex worker is often reduced to being merely a victim of circumstance or a product of poor lifestyle choices. Yet these preconceived notions ignore the varied, complex history of prostitution around the world. Across the centuries and the globe, there have been many places and times in which both prostitutes themselves and their relationship to society differ sharply from the typical modern, American perspective…

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Moon Cakes, Graveyards & Cranberry Sauce: How The Rest Of The World Celebrates Thanksgiving

In many American elementary schools, kids are taught that Thanksgiving is a day to commemorate the moment when Native Americans and pilgrims came together to celebrate a bountiful, life-saving harvest. While this narrative generally neglects to mention the violent fates that awaited these natives, it’s still true that around the world, people unite—and eat a ton of great food—around harvest time. Here’s how people celebrate their equivalent to Thanksgiving in other countries:

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Inside Kyoto, The City Of 10,000 Shrines

Colorful Kansai Japan Kamo River

The Kamo River in Kyoto is a popular location for boating and hiking. During summer months restaurants open their balconies that look out over the river, and many walk the trails that run along the river’s edge. Source: All World Towns

They don’t call Kyoto the “city of 10,000 shrines” for nothing. The ancient cities of Nara and Kyoto are located in what’s known as Japan’s Kansai region, where many emperors resided long ago. Immaculate shrines drape the region in timeless grandeur, and are made that much more splendid courtesy of the region’s natural beauty.

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