World Population Growth In GIF Form

December 3, 2013

World Population Growth

As birth rates in North America and Europe remain stagnant, sub-Saharan Africa’s only continues to grow. Due to high fertility rates and improved and expanded access to medical care, the region stands to double in size from 1.1 to 2.4 billion people in 2050, all things constant.

The Diverse Ancestry Of The United States

November 25, 2013

Ancestry Map

Thanksgiving is just around the corner; and if you’re about to binge on carbohydrates, sodium and fats, thank your ancestors–not the South Beach Diet cookbook you bought and plan on opening this coming Friday. Does your heritage align with this map?

The Most Popular Female Names In America

November 15, 2013

Most Popular Female Names In America

In summation: there are a ton of middle-aged women out there named Jennifer.

The Spread Of Modern Day Slavery In One Distressing Map

November 7, 2013

Modern Day Slavery Map

While slavery seems to some a relic of the past, the oppressive, dignity-robbing practice is still very much alive in the present. Today, the International Labor Organization estimates that 20.9 million men, women and children are shackled to the oppressive chain of slavery (to put this in perspective, that’s the population of Madagascar). In spite of various international conventions and treaties condemning slavery, these men and women are treated as physical property, forced to work through mental or physical threat, and suffer from being physically constrained to a specific environment until their ‘employer’ says otherwise. To learn more about it, be sure to visit CNN’s Freedom Project.

Alaska’s Staggering Size

October 30, 2013

Size Of Alaska

With a whopping area of 663,300 square miles, Alaska might occupy a small amount of space in our national consciousness. It makes up for that, however, by comprising around 17% of the United States’ total area.

Upward Mobility In America

October 29, 2013

Upward Mobility In America

If you want your child to have a shot at entering a higher tier of the socioeconomic echelon, you might not want to settle down in the South. It’s not so much about big or small cities as it is, well, segregation. Says Harvard economics professor Raj Chetty,

We find that some of the highest mobility places in America are smaller towns rather than the biggest cities … What’s happening in those communities is they’re producing these very successful kids, even kids from low-income families.

And they end up leaving those communities typically, moving to bigger cities and being very successful in the broader American economy. But they’re being produced in these smaller towns…take a place like Atlanta … it’s a very residentially segregated city, where low-income people are living in neighborhoods that are quite separated physically from higher income. And the public transportation’s not great. And so that was a common characteristic that we found of many places of low rates of upward mobility.