Commodifying Nature: Ecotourism And Costa Rica’s Osa Peninsula

Osa Peninsula At Dusk

Man silhouetted against the dusk. Source: Julia de Guzman

The Osa Peninsula juts off southwestern Costa Rica and extends into the Pacific Ocean. Incredibly, at least half of all species living in Costa Rica can be found here. Corcovado National Park covers about a third of the peninsula and has been called “the most biologically intense place on Earth” by National Geographic. But to really understand what that means, you have to visit.

Osa Peninsula Golden Hour

Golden hour on the Osa Peninsula. Source: Julia de Guzman

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The Birth Of A Mosquito

We hate these stupid, menacing parasites. They are awful and useless– so much so that scientists have announced that we could completely eradicate the mosquito without any ecological consequences.

If 600,000+ deaths from malaria in 2012 alone aren’t enough to motivate the international community to rid the world of these pests, then it is likely they’ll be around for a while. Here is a video of one of the nasty suckers being born, which, as it turns out, is quite beautiful to watch. Now kill it.

How about some more images of gross, terrifying bugs?

Project Isabela: When Slaughtering 250,000 Goats Meant Saving A Species

Project Isabela Galapagos Islands

The Galapagos Islands Source: Flickr

Charles Darwin called the Galapagos Islands “a little world within itself.” It’s hard to imagine what his life and work would have looked like without this Pacific Island archipelago, and it’s just as challenging to think of the island chain without the giant tortoises which give the islands their name. For a time, though, those tortoises were at risk of disappearing. To save them, Galapagos enthusiasts began to think about conservation in new, lethal and not-so natural terms.

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