8 Fascinating Plants That Grow Around the World

Fascinating Plants Venus

Source: Wikimedia

Given their popularity, it’s pretty likely that you once had a Venus Fly Trap in a tiny, plastic terrarium as a kid. So popular are the perennially hungry plants that their novelty status has made them a threatened species in some areas where it grows wild. While Dionaea muscipula, the plant pictured above, is fascinating as a carnivorous plant that feeds on flies, spiders and other small insects, there are others in the plant kingdom that are just as interesting. Though you aren’t likely to find many of them in a home garden.

Fascinating Plants: The Corpse Flower

Fascinating Plants Corpse Flower Kids

Source: iAnimal

Rafflesia arnoldii is distinguished as the largest individual flower on Earth. It grows in the rain forests of Borneo and Sumatra and can reach a diameter of 3 feet, and weigh as much as 24 pounds. But there is another distinct feature that makes this flower of interest: It smells like rotting flesh, earning it the nickname of “corpse flower.” The stench has a functional purpose, as it attracts flies, beetles and other insects for pollination.

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An Extraordinary Time Lapse Of Melting Ice Crystals

Cross polarized light and a keen eye for detail have culminated in this remarkable time lapse of melting ice crystals not un-reminiscent of a Kandinsky painting. Enjoy.

12 Bizarre Facts About Jellyfish That Will Blow Your Mind

1. Some have “immortal” properties.

The immortal jellyfish (Turritopsis dohrnii) ages like Benjamin Button—when a crisis like starvation presents itself, the jellyfish’s cells transform and revert to their earliest form, a polyp, making this type of jellyfish potentially immortal. Keep reading for more incredibly bizarre facts about jellyfish!

2. They have no “sides”.

Jellyfish have no right or left side—only a top and bottom—as they are symmetrical around a central axis that runs the length of their bodies.

3. Jellyfish are a boon to cancer research.

Green fluorescent proteins (GFPs) from the Aequorea victoria jellyfish species have transformed bio-medical research. The glow-in-the-dark proteins can illuminate specific proteins within the human body to track microscopic activity (for instance, cancer growth).

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