What We Love This Week, Volume CXXV

Underground Worker Railway China

A worker walks in the foundation of a new railway line in Yiwu, Zhejiang province, China, on May 21, 2013. Source: The Atlantic

What Goes On Underground

Cuncas Water Tunnel Brazil

A worker stands inside the Cuncas II tunnel that will link canals being built to divert water from the Sao Francisco river for use in four drought-plagued states in Brazil, near the city of Mauriti, Ceara state, on January 28, 2014. Source: The Atlantic

While we don’t, by and large, live underground, we do work, play, pray, celebrate, visit, smuggle, stockpile, and hide there. The work can be as primitive as mining for coal with donkeys and pickaxes in Pakistan or as sophisticated as unlocking the secrets of the universe at the Large Hadron Collider. The surroundings can be as claustrophobic as a gold-mining hole in the Ivory Coast barely wide enough for one person or as expansive as the 580 feet long, 256 feet wide, 82 feet high floodwater diversion chamber in Japan. For more singular scenes of the world below the earth’s surface, visit The Atlantic.

Batu Caves Thaipusam Underground

Hindu devotees gather at the shrine in Batu Caves temple during Thaipusam in Kuala Lumpur on February 3, 2015. Source: The Atlantic

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Death And High Society: Green-Wood Cemetery In Spring

Class and social stature have been so historically important in New York “society” that the elite have even competed for a place to rot. In the words of architecture critic Paul Goldberger, “It is the ambition of the New Yorker to live upon the Fifth Avenue, to take his airings in the Park, and to sleep with his fathers in the Green-Wood.”

Located in a quiet corner of Brooklyn, it is Green-Wood Cemetery’s natural beauty that makes it such a prestigious place to decompose. By the early 1860s, Green-Wood Cemetery had already gained an international reputation for its grand physical appearance, and quickly became a popular tourist destination. Some noteworthy permanent residents include Leonard Bernstein, Boss Tweed, Charles Ebbets, Jean-Michel Basquait, Louis Comfort Tiffany, Horace Greeley, Civil War general, baseball legends, politicians, artists, entertainers, and inventors.

Today, US culture can be accurately described as one that values youth and fears mortality. A few minutes in Green-Wood cemetery, however, and it seems that death is almost aspirational. Equipped with a camera, I explored the stunning cemetery. Here’s what I found:

To this day the 487-acre parcel attracts history buffs, bird watchers and nature lovers alike. This is what it looks like in the Spring–but try not to let it give you any ideas:

If you enjoyed this ATI Original Video check out our exploration of the Osa Peninsula and our tour of Central Park in the Spring.

Before Brunch, There Were Riots: 1970s Harlem In Photos

1970s Harlem afro women

The popular afro style was everywhere. Source: Mashable.

French photographer Jack Garofalo’s photos of an iconic New York neighborhood have been making some impressive rounds on the Internet lately, catapulting viewers back to a time before it was a brunch destination; when those who lived there did so primarily because they couldn’t afford to move away.

Harlem’s history in the 1960s and 70s was one of violence and loss: the Harlem Riot of 1964 claimed the life of an unarmed black teenager; Nation of Islam members assassinated Malcolm X, and riots again rocked Harlem’s streets following Martin Luther King Jr.’s death in 1968. Many in Harlem responded by moving out in droves – in what some would call an exodus.

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The Life Of Polly Adler, One Of The First Modern Female Moguls

Polly Adler

Source: Haaretz

When Dorothy Parker, Robert Benchley and other members of The Roundtable left the Algonquin Hotel, they could often be overheard saying they’d be “going to Polly’s” later that evening. To the untrained ear, it might have sounded like they were headed to a friend’s for a dinner party.

In a way, that was true: the Polly of whom they spoke was Polly Adler, and she did throw lavish parties almost nightly, entertaining not just writers like Parker and Benchley, but celebrities, mob bosses and other New York City elite. The parties, however infamous, were very exclusive: they took place at Madam Adler’s bordello at 215 West 75th Street.

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