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What We Love This Week, Volume CXLII

Bill Clinton Young Kennedy

Bill Clinton (left) shakes hands with President John F. Kennedy at the White House in 1963. Image Source: www.vintag.es

World Leaders When They Were Teens And Twenty-Somethings

Vladimir Putin Young

Vladimir Putin as a teenager, 1966. Image Source: www.vintag.es

Vladimir Putin was an unassuming, almost cherubic young boy. Kim Jong-il was a playful, smiling infant. And Richard Nixon, as a collegiate football player, was kind of a hunk. Was, of course, is the key word throughout. Sometimes you just don’t know how someone will turn out. And sometimes you do, as in the case of a devil-may-care Yale baseball player named George W. Bush, or the case of a young boy with kind eyes and an earnest smile who would, decades later, become Pope Francis. See all these world leaders and more as teens and twenty-somethings at Vintage Everyday.

Fidel Castro Young

Fidel Castro in New York in 1955. Image Source: Vintage Everyday

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Paris At Night: Daniele Cametti Aspri Highlights Your Favorite Cities In Twilight

Dark Cities series photographer Daniele Cametti Aspri describes his most recent project–capturing cities at night–this way:

“When we go into a dark place from a bright one we live a kind of disorientation, our eyes struggle for the first minutes to get used to the dark.

With every passing minute, slowly, thanks to the residual light that filters under a door, or maybe from a street lamp far away, reality begins to take a different shape. The dim light rests on the surrounding structures by drawing a game of achromatic surfaces, painting more or less intense shades of dark gray that almost reach the black.”

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Paris In The 1940s: A Decade Of Devastation And Rebirth

As World War II raged throughout Europe, the “City of Light” transformed into a city of darkness. While the Germans declined to physically destroy the city upon its 1940 occupation, their presence greatly tested the Parisian psyche. Over two million Parisians fled as the Germans arrived, but those who remained in the capital faced interrogations, curfews, rations, shortages and arrests. The German occupation of France (1940-1944) remains a humiliating time in the history of Paris and, more broadly, France.

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