What “Childhood” Looks Like In Gaza

For those of us fortunate enough to grow up in conflict-free zones, childhood consists primarily of sugary pleasantries and sandy playgrounds. The same cannot be said for children growing up in the crosshairs of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. Featured here is a Palestinian girl in Gaza City, wielding a Kalashnikov rifle amid Islamic Jihad militants.

In the latest burst of militarized conflict in Gaza, the Al-Mezan Centre for Human Rights reports that over 500 children were killed, with UNICEF reporting the complete destruction of 22 schools and over 370,000 Gaza children in need of psychosocial aid.

Oneonta Gorge: Reason Number 2457 Why Oregon Is A Beautiful State

Oneonta Gorge

Add this beauty as yet another reason why you need to make a trip to Oregon this fall. Oneonta Gorge enjoys its status as a botanical area given its unique aquatic plant life. Why the weird name? The first guy to photograph it (in the mid 19th century) was from the small town of Oneonta, New York.

Australia’s Very “Manly” Beach

Manly Beach Australia

If you’re in the market to understand why natural places have such weird names, it often helps to crack open a history book and see who first “discovered” it. In the case of Manly Beach, Australia, it was Captain Arthur Phillip. Upon seeing the indigenous people who called the area home, Phillip intimated that their “confidence and manly behaviour made [him] give the name of Manly Cove to this place”. Phillip later became the first Governor of New South Wales and also the founder of what would eventually become Sydney.

It should be noted that Phillip maintained close relations with aboriginals upon his arrival, saying that they should never be slain and that colonists should not retaliate against non-fatal spearing. That, however, changed when his gamekeeper had been killed by Aboriginals and Phillip had six of them put to death.

Daniel Barter Takes On Abandoned New York

There’s no denying our fascination with abandoned buildings and urban decay. Daniel Barter is just one in a long line of photographers who appreciate the historic validity of documenting the various ways buildings fall prey to the passage of time. This young London-based photographer has filled two amazing books with images like these (with help from fellow artist Daniel Marbaix), traveling all the way from the outer zones of Chernobyl to New York, Germany to Pennsylvania in order for the perfect shot of structures deferring to the rule of nature.

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