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What We Love This Week, Volume CXXXVII

Syrian Girl Ash Blood

Image Source: The Atlantic

Syria’s Children

Syrian Boy Girl Rubble

Image Source: The Atlantic

Over the course of four years of war in Syria, over 4 million refugees have fled the country. Naturally, many of those 4 million are children. If they’re lucky, they’ve left their homes, been literally thrown over or shoved through barbed border fences, crossed seas, and found safe haven in Europe. Of course, many of Syria’s children aren’t at all that lucky. Head to The Atlantic to visit the rubble, hospitals, battlefields, and refugee camps where Syria’s youngest are bearing the brunt of this war.

Syrian Mother Baby Tent

Image Source: The Atlantic

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This Year’s Winning Washington Post Traveler Contest Photos Are Stunning

Didn’t get to travel much this summer? Pending your persuasion, the winners of this year’s Washington Post travel photo contest will ease — or encourage — your wanderlust. The national newspaper just announced this year’s winners, with judges selecting three winning photos, along with ten honorable mentions.

Dick Snyder captured what the Post considered to be the best travel photo, depicting Cannon Beach in greyscale (above). The black and white photography enthusiast had the award-winning photo printed on metal to make the landscape really pop. Second place went to Hadi Dimachkieh, who snapped a stunning shot of aquamarine glacier bits on a 10-day trip to Iceland (below).

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Greenland’s (Disappearing) Coast Looks Out Of This World

Coast Of Greenland

While beautiful, Greenland’s majestic natural features have the potential to cause a lot of grief if we’re not careful. In February 2006, researchers at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory reported that glaciers in Greenland are melting twice as fast as they were in the previous five years – and losing more ice volume than anyone expected.

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Retro Disneyland: When Disney “Magic” Only Cost $2

Disney Lead

Source: LIFE/Getty Images

Soon after Disneyland opened it gates in July 1955, a LIFE magazine article declared the park “the stuff children’s dreams are made on.” Then, same as now, parents’ single biggest complaint centered on cost. Then, unlike now, children’s admission would set parents back $2. (Today, parents must part with $93 if they want their 3-9 year old child to meet Mickey.)

“Disney had expected that $2 would see a child through enough of his $17 million wonderland, but mothers said twice that was needed to keep any enterprising small boy pacified,” LIFE wrote. Add to admission the cost of food and the inevitable souvenir, and it is easy to see the origins of such complaints – and its present-day parallels.

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