The Most Interesting Photography From All That Is Interesting

Australia’s Very “Manly” Beach

Manly Beach Australia

If you’re in the market to understand why natural places have such weird names, it often helps to crack open a history book and see who first “discovered” it. In the case of Manly Beach, Australia, it was Captain Arthur Phillip. Upon seeing the indigenous people who called the area home, Phillip intimated that their “confidence and manly behaviour made [him] give the name of Manly Cove to this place”. Phillip later became the first Governor of New South Wales and also the founder of what would eventually become Sydney.

It should be noted that Phillip maintained close relations with aboriginals upon his arrival, saying that they should never be slain and that colonists should not retaliate against non-fatal spearing. That, however, changed when his gamekeeper had been killed by Aboriginals and Phillip had six of them put to death.

Daniel Barter Takes On Abandoned New York

There’s no denying our fascination with abandoned buildings and urban decay. Daniel Barter is just one in a long line of photographers who appreciate the historic validity of documenting the various ways buildings fall prey to the passage of time. This young London-based photographer has filled two amazing books with images like these (with help from fellow artist Daniel Marbaix), traveling all the way from the outer zones of Chernobyl to New York, Germany to Pennsylvania in order for the perfect shot of structures deferring to the rule of nature.

Continue Reading

Little Liuqiu’s Picturesque Flower Vase Rock

Vase Rock Taiwan

Venture just west of Donggang, Taiwan and you’ll find the island of Little Liuqiu. For ecology lovers, this island is a must visit: Little Liuqiu is the country’s only large coral island (and by “large” we mean 2.6 square miles) whose aquaculture is just as intricate as its numerous caves. Above is Flower Vase Rock, one of Little Liuqiu’s more popular tourist spots.

Hummingbirds Pack A Colorful Punch

While the smallest bird in the entire avian kingdom, hummingbirds still pack a colorful punch when it comes to their magnificently iridescent feathers. From bright crimson red to luminous emerald, to even a modest brown color, hummingbird feathers are extremely intricate- and there are over 300 species of this extraordinary bird spread throughout the Western hemisphere! As you can imagine, it’s not an easy task to capture these little guys on film – but when it happens, the results are fantastic.

Rufous Bird

Source: Bored Panda

Green Bird

Source: Lynx Eds

Continue Reading