What We Love This Week, Volume CXX

Smithsonian Winners Green Net

Women of a small village near Vinh Hy Bay, Vietnam, sew a fishing net. Photographer: Pham Ty Source: The Atlantic

Winners Of The 2014 Smithsonian Magazine Photo Contest Announced

Smithsonian Winners Beijing

Reading in the National Library of China in Beijing. Photographer: Yilang Peng. Source: The Atlantic

This year, Smithsonian Magazine editors received over 26,500 entries for their annual photo contest. Just this week, the magazine announced 2014’s winners in each competition category, being: the Natural World, Travel, People, Americana, Altered Images and Mobile. Given the high quality and diversity of all the shots, we have a hard time fathoming how they arrived at their decisions. See more at The Atlantic.

Smithsonian Winners Holy Week

Holy Week celebrations in Acobamba, Tarma, Peru. Photographer: David Martín Huamaní Bedoya. Source: The Atlantic

Continue Reading

Paris At Night: Daniele Cametti Aspri Highlights Your Favorite Cities In Twilight

Dark Cities series photographer Daniele Cametti Aspri describes his most recent project–capturing cities at night–this way:

“When we go into a dark place from a bright one we live a kind of disorientation, our eyes struggle for the first minutes to get used to the dark.

With every passing minute, slowly, thanks to the residual light that filters under a door, or maybe from a street lamp far away, reality begins to take a different shape. The dim light rests on the surrounding structures by drawing a game of achromatic surfaces, painting more or less intense shades of dark gray that almost reach the black.”

Continue Reading

Childhood Homelessness, A Hidden American Problem

Childhood Homelessness

Source: 4 Bit News

Homelessness is a national problem in the United States, and one whose victims are often hidden. They aren’t just the haggard Vietnam vet or the disabled man on the corner asking for assistance; they’re the children and families who couch surf, bounce between friends’ homes, live in cars, subsist in tent cities or stay in hotels. According to the National Center on Family Homelessness (NCFH), as of November 2014 2.5 million homeless children live across the United States. Without intervention, those are 2.5 million people who could become chronically homeless adults.

Childhood Homelessness Siblings

Two brothers play cards in the common area of “Nickelsville,” a tent community in West Seattle. The community has relocated throughout the years. Source: Seattle PI

Continue Reading

31 Fantastic Photos from NASA’s Glory Days

NASA Glory Days Ed White

Ed White floats out of the Gemini IV capsule during the first U.S. spacewalk in 1965. Source: NASA

The Soviet Union launched Sputnik in 1957. For United States leaders, it was one of the chilliest moments of the Cold War as the Soviets had shown technical capabilities far more advanced than their own and expanded the “battlefield” not just to the sky, but outer space.

A year after the Sputnik launch, President Dwight Eisenhower and the U.S. Congress created the National Aeronautics and Space Administration in an effort to catch up – and hopefully pass – their Soviet rivals in the so-called “Space Race.” In the following years, NASA launched a sequence of programs – Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo – that would systematically check off all the steps needed to explore space. Mercury focused on getting a man into orbit. Gemini put two-men teams into space to perform spacewalks, separate sections of spacecraft, and safely link them together again. Apollo headed to the moon, and our world would change.

Continue Reading

Close Pop-in
Like All That Is Interesting

Get The Most Fascinating Content On The Web In Your Facebook & Twitter Feeds