Bombs, Fat Cats And Charlie Chaplin: Here’s What Wall Street Looked Like In The Early 20th Century

At first glance, this street could be just another 0.7-mile long stretch of road in the middle of a bustling city. But it’s so much more than that. Some consider it the heart of New York and, without a doubt, the city’s financial center (and some might say the world’s).

Wall Street and finance are inexorably linked, due in large part to the presence of the New York Stock Exchange on Wall Street, which is by far the biggest stock exchange in the world. Over time, the presence of the NYSE on this particular street ended up attracting other notable financial organizations until Wall Street became the financial juggernaut it is today.

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Wall Street Newspaper

At the end of the 19th century, the most important financial publication and the original stock report, the Customer’s Afternoon Letter, changed its name to the Wall Street Journal. This change would be vital in helping people associate Wall Street with stocks and finance. Source: Blogspot

Wall Street Dow

At the end of the 19th century, Charles Dow began tracking stocks and, soon enough, his average prices were seen as a trusted benchmark. He would go on to found the Dow Jones & Company financial firm, a staple on Wall Street for over a century. Source: NJ

Wall Street NYSE

The New York Stock Exchange at the beginning of the 20th century. It might just be the most important financial building in the world. Source: Wikimedia

Wall Street Corner

The famed building on 23 Wall Street. It’s been the JP Morgan bank for most of its existence, but it’s known to most simply as The Corner. It still looks today very much like it did 100 years ago. Source: Finance Bookshelf

Wall Street Bombing

On September 16, 1920, Wall Street saw the deadliest terrorist act in U.S. history up until that point. A wagon with a bomb exploded on the street, killing 38 people and injuring hundreds. Source: New York Daily News

Wall Street Damage

The damage caused by the bomb is still visible on the JP Morgan building today. Source: Wikimedia

Wall Street Car

Nobody was ever charged with the bombing, although a group of Italian anarchists called Galleanists were thought responsible. Source: Blogspot

Wall Street Floor

The trading floor of the New York Stock Exchange before the appearance of computers and digital screens. This is the chaotic image most of us have when we think of stock exchanges. Source: Compliance X

Wall Street Trading

The hustle & bustle of the stock exchange trading floor was subdued somewhat once ticker tapes were replaced with computers and digital screens. Source: Wall Street Journal

Wall Street Statue

Wall Street has always been a popular spot for public gatherings. Source: Blogspot

Wall Street Chaplin

Celebrities were sometimes brought in to endorse companies and boost sales. Here is a rally on Wall Street where Charlie Chaplin is standing on the shoulders of actor Douglas Fairbanks. Source: Tumblr

Wall Street Hoffman

Notorious political activist Abbie Hoffman staged Wall Street protests in the 60s. Hoffman demonstrated his knowledge of political theater in the late 1960s by leading a group of protesters to Wall Street, where they threw dollar bills onto the trading floor. Predictably, the traders fought each other to pick up every last slice of currency. After this event, Hoffman would later go on to found the Yippies, or the Youth International Party. Source: Al Jazeera

Wall Street Bankers

The 20th century saw the development of numerous skyscrapers dominating the New York skyline. The original Bankers Trust building on 14 Wall Street is one of the oldest. It was built in 1912 and designated a New York landmark in 1997. Source: Wikimedia

Wall Street Irving

The Irving Trust Company Building to the right. Built in 1929, this building is situated at the corner of Wall Street and Broadway, two of the most famous streets in the world. Its address is 1 Wall Street. Source: Shorpy

Wall Street Church

Believe it or not, Wall Street is not all just financial buildings. The Trinity Church is one of its main attractions. Seen here in 1905, the church used to be an imposing building, but it has since been overshadowed by the skyscrapers built around it. Source: Photographium

Wall Street Crash

The Wall Street Crash of 1929, also known as Black Tuesday, is the most famous (and most devastating) event in the history of the district. It sparked the 10-year long Great Depression. Source: Huffington Post

Wall Street Protest

Contrary to popular belief, the crash made a lot of people miserable but it didn’t lead to a wave of suicides consisting of bankers throwing themselves out windows. Source: Wordpress

Wall Street Riot

Following the crash, the streets of Wall Street became virtually inaccessible to vehicles due to protests and riots Source: Looseness Of Association

Wall Street Washington

George Washington’s statue in front of Federal Hall, just across from the NYSE is one of the most recognizable landmarks of Wall Street. It commemorates the fact that this is where Washington was sworn in as President. Source: Transmorgified

Wall Street Exchange

The look of the New York Stock Exchange has changed little over the last hundred years. Source: Wikipedia

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Of course, this wasn’t always the case. Wall Street has a long history with many significant events taking place, both good and bad. In the 17th century, the actual wall on Wall Street was used as fortifications against Native American tribes. In the early 18th century, Wall Street was the home of the first official slave market in New York City. In that same century, Wall Street served as the background for the inauguration of George Washington, the first presidential inauguration in U.S. history. It wasn’t really until the beginning of the 20th century that Wall Street started thriving as a financial center.

Want to see New York City in its chaotic early days (re: 1928)? Check out this video:

50 Incredible Examples Of Macro Photography In Action

Much ado is made about portraiture of the world’s most glamorous, but some of the best photography out there captures the lives of those whose existence we can barely perceive. Macro photography captures ordinary objects—often insects and plants—with extraordinary detail. The resulting photographs reveal aspects that aren’t obvious upon first glance, transforming something as simple as a drop of water into a colorful kaleidoscope of color and depth.

Macro photography can convert benign insects into big-eyed monsters, or highlight the true beauty of some natural elements (such as snowflakes) in great detail. Here are some of the world’s most incredible macro photography images:

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Snowflake in Detail

Source: Bored Panda

Spider Macro Photography

Source: pictureline

Platinum Macro Photography

Platinum by R. Tanaka. Source: Demilked

Coral Macro Photography

Coral. Source: Felix Salazar

Sea Urchin in Detail

Sea urchin. Source: Norway Street

Coral Up Close Photos

Coral. Source: Felix Salazar

Salt and Pepper Under Microscope

Salt and pepper. Source: Wikimedia

Incredible Lizard Eye

Source: CC Cam

Bubbles Macro Photography

Source: Batailley

Cactus Spikes Macro Photography

Cactus spikes. Source: Neely Wang Photography

Marijuana Macro Photography

Marijuana. Source: Flickr

Dragonfly in Detail

Source: Spotimg

Soap and Water Incredible Up Close

Soap and water. Source: rebloggy

Beautiful Physalis Fruits

Physalis fruits. Source: HQ Wallpapers

Dew on Spiderweb

Dew on a spiderweb. Source: Miks Media

Ice Macro Photography

Ice sheet by Brian Valentine. Source: Telegraph

Colorful Insects on Branch

Source: webneel

Cherry Leaf Macro Photography

Cherry leaf. Source: Photograph: to draw in light

Bismuth Up Close

Bismuth, an element. Source: demilked

Rusty Chain Up Close

Rusty chain. Source: Justin's Blog

Butterfly Egg Magnified

Butterfly egg on a Passiflora plant. Source: Fun is for Assholes

Colorful Macro Photography

Source: deviantART

Pine Needles Up Close

Source: Wikimedia

Ladybug Macro Photography

Source: Walls Evolve

Snowflake Macro Photography

Snowflake by Alexey Kljatov. Source: Bored Panda

Tropical Flowers Up Close

Source: Macro Nature

Winter Screw Up Close

Source: Gizmodo

Leaf Photography Shihya Kowatari

Source: Photoity

Fire Macro Photography

Source: All Photoz

Flying Dragonfly

Source: Wall Finest

Dandelion Spores

Source: deviantART

Peacock Feather Macro Photography

Peacock feather. Source: Darryl Smith

Insects Up Close

Source: crafthubs

What We Love This Week, Volume XCVIII

The Winners Of This Year’s Society Of Biology Photography Contest

Over 800 amateur photographers submitted their work to this year’s Society of Biology photography competition, whose theme was “Horne, Habitat and Shelter”. Shooting locations were as diverse as their subjects, ranging from jaguars in the jungle to buffalo near geysers to this year’s winner, a blackbird in a garden. Check out some of the shortlisted entries at My Modern Met.

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