Be The Smartest Person In The Room, Join The Just Launched All That Is Interesting Newsletter

31 Great Travel Selfies That Prove The Self-Portrait Isn’t Always Obnoxious

Best Travel Selfies Vancouver Island

Neal Holmes and his partner take a dip at Vancouver Island, Canada.

A common criticism of the selfie is that the photo doesn’t really transport the viewer anywhere–save for the filtered, idealized “reality” that the portrait-taker wants viewers to see. And generally speaking, that’s a really boring destination.

The same cannot always be said, however, about travel selfies. Love them or absolutely hate them, these photos have taken the travel photography world by storm, and in June BBC Travel invited readers to submit their own travel selfies for review.

Continue Reading

How Seattle Is Facing Homelessness With Portraits

Facing Homelessness Portrait Robert

Robert Lawrence, Source: Facing Homelessness

“My name is Robert Lawrence. I’m from Tennessee, arrived last year & found Seattle to be a very beautiful city, full of life, also filled with the rich & poor…”

The “community” section of the website for Facing Homelessness–a Seattle-based non-profit that provides aid to the homeless–is packed with photos. Strikingly intimate black and white portraits spill beyond its borders (you have to scroll horizontally to see them all). Soon you realize that many of the faces in this community actually belong to Seattle’s homeless. Then you realize that many of those faces come with a story. And that most of those stories start, appropriately enough, with a name. Meet some of these individuals in the gallery below:

Continue Reading

What We Love This Week, Volume CXXXI

Jupiter Closeup Swirling Clouds

Jupiter’s high-altitude photographed from a distance of 1.4 million miles on February 28, 2007. Source: The Atlantic

Before Pluto: The Other Awe-Inspiring New Horizons Photos

Jupiter Moons Shadows

Two of Jupiter’s largest moons, the volcanic Io (left) and the icy Ganymede (right), photographed from a distance of 42.5 million miles on January 17, 2007. Source: The Atlantic

While you’ve definitely seen the new Pluto photos and you probably know that those photos are the fruit of the New Horizons’ nearly ten-year journey, you may not realize all that happened along the way. It zipped past our moon (within nine hours of launch), flew close by a 1.6-mile wide asteroid (that just happened to be in its path), and crossed the orbit of every planet between here and Pluto.

Chief among those planetary confrontations was Jupiter, which New Horizons photographed from late 2006 to mid-2007. And perhaps it’s just that Jupiter is our solar system’s largest planet or that it’s orbited by dozens of moons (one of the largest of which has over 400 volcanoes) or that it’s shrouded in swirling clouds, but these photos might just be the most stunning ones that New Horizons captured. For more under-the-radar images from the New Horizons mission, visit The Atlantic.

Jupiter Moons Io Europa

A 190-mile high volcanic plume erupts from Io (right, with two smaller volcanic plumes also visible), alongside Europa (left), another of Jupiter’s largest moons, both photographed from a distance of about 2.5 million miles on March 2, 2007. Source: The Atlantic

Continue Reading

Close Pop-in
Like All That Is Interesting

Get The Most Fascinating Content On The Web In Your Facebook & Twitter Feeds