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22 Photos Of The Montreal Metro That Prove Subways Can Be Beautiful

Public transportation systems don’t get a whole lot of respect for style — think New York City’s notoriously dangerous and graffiti-ridden subway cars of the 1980s. But 20-year-old Canadian photographer Christopher Forsyth went out to show that subway stations — specifically the Montreal Metro — can be more than just crowded and dirty. Indeed, as Forsyth’s photos below show, they can be an architectural treasure:

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DeLaSavane

DeLaSavane Station. Image Source: Chris Forsyth

Fabre

Fabre Station. Image Source: Chris Forsyth

Jean Talon

Jean Talon Station. Image Source: Chris Forsyth

Charlevoix

Charlevoix Station. Image Source: Chris Forsyth

Atwater

Atwater Station. Image Source: Chris Forsyth

Plamondon

Plamondon Station. Image Source: Chris Forsyth

De Leglise

De Leglise Station. Image Source: Chris Forsyth

Frontenac

Frontenac Station. Image Source: Chris Forsyth

Langelier

Langelier Station. Image Source: Chris Forsyth

Laurier

Laurier Station. Image Source: Chris Forsyth

Assomption

Assomption Station. Image Source: Chris Forsyth

Radisson 2

Radisson Station. Image Source: Chris Forsyth

DeL'Église

De L'Église Station. Image Source: Chris Forsyth

Champ De Mars

Champ De Mars Station. Image Source: Chris Forsyth

Assomption

Assomption Station. Image Source: Chris Forsyth

Berri UQAM

Berri UQAM Station. Image Source: Chris Forsyth

Sherbrooke

Sherbrooke Station. Image Source: Chris Forsyth

Radisson

Radisson Station. Image Source: Chris Forsyth

Lasalle

Lasalle Station. Image Source: Chris Forsyth

Laurier

Laurier Station. Image Source: Chris Forsyth

Lionel Groulx

Lionel Groulx Station. Image Source: Chris Forsyth

Sherbrooke_2

Sherbrooke Station. Image Source: Chris Forsyth

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Photo Of The Day: A Hockey Team From The Very First Winter Olympics In 1924

Photo courtesy Chamonix 1924 Official Olympic Report, via Slate

Photo courtesy Chamonix 1924 Official Olympic Report, via Slate

We’re still two years away from the next Winter Olympics, but on this day in 1924, the very first Winter Olympics took place in Chamonix, France. After the opening ceremony on January 25th, there followed ten days of tournaments, some of which are still recognizable—ski jumping, curling—and some of which sound utterly baffling, such as the military patrol event (a short-lived entry which eventually evolved into today’s more familiar biathlon). Even the sports that have remained relatively unchanged have gone through huge alterations in terms of uniforms and equipment, as can be seen from the worryingly unprotected hockey team above.

258 athletes from 16 nations participated in the first games. There were several memorable highlights, including the Olympic figure skating debut of Norway’s Sonja Henie, who was only 11 years old at the time (she came last, but won gold at the next three Winter Olympics). America lays claim to the very first awarded gold medal, courtesy of speed-skater Charles Jewtraw. Sadly for the host country, France failed to win a single gold medal.

Liked this? Check out the 1948 Olympics in photos, or enjoy 15 epic images from the 2014 Sochi Winter Olympics.

Photo Of The Day: How To See The Historic Five-Planet Alignment

Five Planet Alignment

The five planets visible to the naked eye will be able to be seen all together for the first time in over a decade. Image Source: imgur

Right now, for the first time in a decade, five planets are simultaneously visible to the naked eye from Earth. This rare celestial event can be seen every morning until late February at around 45 minutes before sunrise, with the view peaking in late January/early February.

Each morning, Jupiter, Mars, Saturn, Venus, and finally Mercury will rise, in that order. These planets (and Earth) all orbit the sun in a similar plane called the ecliptic. Each planet, however, orbits the Sun at different speeds, meaning that they rarely line up in a way that can be seen from Earth. But for the next few weeks, things will line up just right.

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What We Loved This Week Jan. 17 – 23

The harsh beauty of Greenland, Alaska, and Antarctica (where they’ve built an entire base on skis), plus epic vintage beards and hilariously hideous 1970s menswear.

Giant Beards 1

The beard has had limited historical popularity in Western culture, mostly only appearing in the late 16th and early 17th centuries, then again in the mid-Victorian period. Image Source: Vintage Everyday

The Giant, Epic Beards Of Times Past

Giant Beards 2

In the early 18th century, beards were often a sign of radical political views, such as socialism. Image Source: Vintage Everyday

Say the word beard these days and most people will picture a furry-faced hipster showing off a year’s worth of untamed bristle. But back in the Victorian age, there existed a very real “beard movement.” A slew of articles celebrated the beard, including artist James Ward’s “Essay In Defense Of The Beard,” and T.S. Gowing’s “The Philosophy Of Beards.”

It wasn’t just a fashion statement, though: Believe it or not, doctors, who were starting to see the link between air quality and health, also encouraged patients to grow beards, claiming the hair would filter the smog-choked air of 18th century Britain. Modern doctors, however, disagree: Beards are actually a breeding ground for disease-carrying ectoparasites. See the spectacularly bearded men who lacked this knowledge at Vintage Everyday.

Giant Beards 3

The beard trend peaked in 1870, when almost half of all men wore untrimmed whiskers. Image Source: Vintage Everyday

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