Inside The New Addition To New York’s Mass Transit System

new york subway tline tunnel

The T line will eventually carry passengers between 125th Street in East Harlem and Hanover Square in the Financial District after completion of the third and fourth phases. IMAGE: BHUSHAN MONDKAR Source: Mashable

Free time is one of the few things that New York City doesn’t offer its denizens, and many living there look to commute times as one reason why. In New York, mass transit systems tend to take more time than they save. For those living on Manhattan’s east side, that’s finally about to end.

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What We Love This Week, Volume CXXV

Underground Worker Railway China

A worker walks in the foundation of a new railway line in Yiwu, Zhejiang province, China, on May 21, 2013. Source: The Atlantic

What Goes On Underground

Cuncas Water Tunnel Brazil

A worker stands inside the Cuncas II tunnel that will link canals being built to divert water from the Sao Francisco river for use in four drought-plagued states in Brazil, near the city of Mauriti, Ceara state, on January 28, 2014. Source: The Atlantic

While we don’t, by and large, live underground, we do work, play, pray, celebrate, visit, smuggle, stockpile, and hide there. The work can be as primitive as mining for coal with donkeys and pickaxes in Pakistan or as sophisticated as unlocking the secrets of the universe at the Large Hadron Collider. The surroundings can be as claustrophobic as a gold-mining hole in the Ivory Coast barely wide enough for one person or as expansive as the 580 feet long, 256 feet wide, 82 feet high floodwater diversion chamber in Japan. For more singular scenes of the world below the earth’s surface, visit The Atlantic.

Batu Caves Thaipusam Underground

Hindu devotees gather at the shrine in Batu Caves temple during Thaipusam in Kuala Lumpur on February 3, 2015. Source: The Atlantic

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Housewives Before WW2: Women On The Cusp Of Transformation

american housewife 1941 plate hanging

Hanging a china plate as decoration while Tony plays. Source: Mashable

We’ve written before on the ways war has inspired countless technical innovations that we take for granted every day, but haven’t focused too much on the ways it has transformed the home and its accompanying gender roles. In this arena, one surprising “accomplishment” of World War II was the way it catalyzed the average American woman’s move from the home and to the marketplace, where she found remunerative work–and where she more often than not stayed.

Just two months before the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, LIFE Magazine ran a piece by photographer William C. Shrout covering the duties of the typical, middle class American mother and housewife, a figure whose June Cleaver associations are becoming more mythical with each passing decade.

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