The 5 Coolest Carnivorous Plants in the World

January 28, 2014

As a way to cope with life in environments ridden with poor soil quality, carnivorous plants have evolved to supplement their diets with animal organisms. While most carnivorous plants capture, kill and consume insects, some have been known to eat small rodents like mice. Here are five types of carnivorous plants that will leave your head spinning.

Carnivorous Plants No. 1: Drosera

Species from the drosera genus are often called sundews since they, as you might imagine, appear as if they’re covered in dew. Attracting unsuspecting insects with this “dew”–which is actually a sticky, digestive enzyme–drosera plants are able to ensnare and even digest their prey. These plants are common in nutrient-deficient places like bogs and sandy beaches. Nearly 200 different species of drosera plants have been identified.

{ Read The Rest Of This Post… }

The Beauty Of Japanese Wisteria

February 21, 2013

Japanese Wisteria

The wisteria is oft-cited as one of the most romantic and enchanting flowering plants to grace the earth, and as the image above suggests, such esteem is warranted. While its sweet, grape-scented flowers take years to bloom (the Japanese wisteria will only flower after maturing fully), its marvelousness can last for up to fifty years.

The World’s Largest And Smelliest Flowers

January 15, 2013
The World's Largest And Smelliest Flowers Corpse Flower

Source: Hype Science

The World’s Largest And Smelliest Flowers: The Corpse Flower

Flowers are said to symbolize innocence, life and beauty. How ironic, then, that the largest of them all is evocative of death. Titan arum, or the corpse flower, exists naturally in the rain forests of Western Sumatra and in the gardens of botany big-leaguers throughout the world.

With dark purple coloring not unlike bruises and pooled blood, the corpse flower’s imposing size is as commanding as its carrion stench: at its heaviest, the imposing plant weighs in at around 165 pounds with a height of over 10 feet.

{ Read The Rest Of This Post… }

The Vibrant Bitter Oyster Fungus

November 24, 2012
Bitter Oyster Plant

Source: Wikimedia, http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/e/e8/PanellusStipticusAug12_2009.jpg

While it is called a bitter oyster plant, the technicolor specimen above is actually a fungus.