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Mother Teresa, The Nun Who Wore A Sari

Kolkata Mother Statue Albania

Mother Teresa’s statue in her birthplace of Tirana, Albania. Image Source: Dennis Jarvis, Flickr

Once the capital of colonial India, Kolkata was also the home of the world’s most famous nun—a nun who did not wear a religious habit, but a white sari with thin blue stripes: Mother Teresa.

Today, 18 years after her death, the city that once served as the headquarters of the East India Company continues to struggle with poverty and economic inequality, two of the very issues to which Teresa devoted her life.

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eL Seed Paints Peace Across The Arab World

El Seed Didouche Algeria

eL Seed’s calligraffiti adorns a building in Algiers, the capital and largest city of Algeria. Image Source:

Every day, the media parade negativity across our screens through stories of war, hardship, and murder. Modern artists’ attempts to tackle these issues are often overshadowed by the latest breaking news.

But graffiti is art that cannot be ignored. These large, colorful pieces force overlooked and forgotten messages into the public eye. French-Tunisian artist eL Seed uses calligraffiti–graffiti rendered in calligraphy (in eL Seed’s case, ancient Arabic calligraphy)–to invoke a sense of unity between both individuals and nations, particularly in the Arab/European communities where he often works. No matter where he works, his messages are uniquely related to each place; every Arabic word is painted to create an open dialogue, especially between antagonistic factions, within each community.

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What We Love This Week, Volume CXXXVI

Sailboat Sand Water Ripples

“Between Land and Sea” by Abrar Mohsin, taken in Dubai. Image Source: National Geographic

Surreally Beautiful: National Geographic’s Best Photos Of The Month

Dolphins Swimming Turquoise Purple

“Poster Dolphins” by Erika Hart, taken off Makua Beach, Hawaii. Image Source: National Geographic

As always, National Geographic photography speaks for itself. Well, except when the photographer’s story of getting the shot is almost as interesting as the shot itself. And the stories behind National Geographic’s best photos of the month are no exception. Like when Elliot Ross braved the 100-degree temperatures of New Mexico’s White Sands National Monument, then lost his spot of shade to some tourists who beat him to it, only to find that the tourists’ cars and gear made for the perfect photo. Or when Hideki Mizuta found a hill in Lithuania absolutely covered in thousands of crosses, put there as a show of resistance to foreign oppression, then happened to catch a sole little girl running through his frame. For more of the stories–and, of course, the photos–visit National Geographic.

White Sand Car Sky

“White Hot” by Elliot Ross, taken at White Sands National Monument, New Mexico. Image Source: National Geographic

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