10 Terrifying Prehistoric Creatures (That Weren’t Dinosaurs)

For 135 million years, dinosaurs were the undisputed rulers of the Earth, and might still be today if they weren’t wiped out by a cataclysmic event 65 million years ago. However, our planet has been around for a lot longer than that and, as it turns out, nature is quite adept at producing nightmare-inducing monsters. To think that dinosaurs are the only scary inhabitants of our prehistoric past would be a mistake.

Gorgonops

terrifying prehistoric creatures gorgonops

A precursor to the dinosaurs Source: Wikia

Earth was full of scary monsters before the dinosaurs came along. A prime example is gorgonops, an animal that lived 260 million years ago, way before dinosaurs became the dominant predators. Growing around six to ten feet in length, gorgonops was a fast and vicious predator which allowed it to become the apex predator of its day. It also helped that gorgonops had massive canines that almost protruded beyond its lower jaw.

Continue Reading

A Brief History Of The World’s Oldest Disease

Leprosy History Old Woman

A portrait of an elderly blind woman at the Nuang Kan Leper Colony in Kengtung, Myanmar. Source: DVB

A plague to rule them all, leprosy is very likely the oldest infectious disease in human history. Written accounts of the disease — sometimes referred to as Hansen’s Disease—date as far back as 600 B.C., and the genetic evidence alone supports the existence of Leprosy infections in 100,000 year-old remains.

While many other human diseases have been around as long as human beings have–such as nutritional night blindness, tuberculosis and of course sexually transmitted infections (syphilis)–Leprosy’s social history is the one that is most inextricably linked with human evolution.
Continue Reading

27 Incredible Underwater Pictures of Schooling Fish

Like starling murmurations, schooling fish are one of the world’s most wondrous natural phenomena. Not to be confused with shoaling fish (which refers to fish who gather to swim together socially), schooling fish are defined as a large group of fish that swim synchronously.

Swimming in a school allows fish to protect themselves from predators, improve foraging, and swim more efficiently. While scientists are still working to better understand fish schooling, experiments over the past few decades have provided much information about how (and why) fishes form schools.

For one, schooling is most likely a genetic behavior. In fact, a combination of behavioral traits and unique sensory abilities allow fish to move fluidly and in sync with the school. While schooling fish make moving in perfect time look easy, there are various factors that the fish must instantaneously account for; the fish must quickly respond to water currents and react instantly to changes within the group. Scientists have discovered that fish base their decisions on a synthesis of where all the fish in its field of view are headed, instead of following its nearest neighbors.

Check out these 27 pictures of the incredible phenomenon:

Continue Reading

Close Pop-in
Like All That Is Interesting

Get The Most Fascinating Content On The Web In Your Facebook & Twitter Feeds