Great News, Caffeine Addicts: Science Says Coffee Is Good For You

August 21, 2014

Drink 2-3 cups of coffee a day and don’t have a ruinous diet? Studies show you’ll live longer than those who don’t and decrease the likelihood of contracting Type-2 Diabetes. Watch on for more pro-coffee facts to throw at people who say you have a “problem”.

4 Of The Most Evil Science Experiments Ever Performed

August 20, 2014

Scientists are heroes. At their best, scientists represent the best in humanity—intelligence, curiosity, and skeptical rigor. This perceived goodwill licenses scientists to do things in society that ordinary people wouldn’t be allowed to get away with. If a random person burst into your house with a bubbling test tube and shouted “Quick! Drink this!” you’d call the police. Put that person in a white lab coat, though, and you’ll only delay long enough to thank him for coming in the nick of time.

Scientists are human, however, and it turns out that human beings who’ve been given that level of trust almost always prove themselves the last people in the world who should be trusted to look after a goldfish. Here are 4 of the most appallingly evil experiments ever carried out in the name of science. Note that many of the experiments were of limited or non-existent value. It turns out that freaks who like to torture human beings are generally bad at designing double-blind trials.

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The Hubble Flickr Stream Is The Most Stunning Thing You’ll See All Week

August 18, 2014
Hubble In Space

Source: NASA

Before Galileo turned his telescope to the skies in 1610, all that we knew of the universe we knew because we could see it with our naked eyes. Little did we know what wonders they hid from us. Galileo’s work sparked a revolution in science and astronomy, and while he may have made vast improvements on the telescope of his day, NASA’s 24,000 lb. space telescope has collected over 100 terabytes of data since its launch in 1990. A large number of these images have been curated to the Hubble’s Flickr stream. They give us an exciting glimpse into what those of Galileo’s time were missing, and what we, too, could miss if we don’t pay attention.

And if these images leave you yearning for some video footage, fear not: we’ve got you covered with the most important image Hubble has ever captured.

Hubble Flickr Homunculus Nebula

Source: Flickr

Huge clouds of matter – known today as the Homunculus Nebula – consist of byproducts from the binary star system Eta Carinae, which experienced a supernova impostor event in 1843. This is the closest star system to Earth which could experience true supernova status in the near future. (The near future in space-time could still mean a million years from now.)

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4 Wonders Of Our Solar System

August 8, 2014

Even though astronomy is one of our oldest sciences, our understanding of the universe is still in its infancy. There are so many fascinating things in the universe and we don’t even have to travel too far to see them. Many of them are right here in our very own solar system.

Olympus Mons

Solar System Viking

Actual NASA image taken by Viking 1 Source: Wikipedia

For a long time, we considered Olympus Mons, located on Mars, to be the tallest mountain in our solar system. At a height of 14 miles, it is almost three times as tall as Mount Everest, the highest point on our planet.

Now we know that there is actually a slightly taller mountain in our solar system. It is called Rheasilvia and it is located on an asteroid named Vesta. Even so, Olympus Mons remains far more impressive. Although Rheasilvia is a little taller, the mountain on Mars is simply gigantic in scope.

Solar System Crater

Massive crater located right at the center of the mountain Source: European Space Agency

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Want Some Perspective? Check Out North America’s Size In Relation To Jupiter’s Red Dot

August 6, 2014

North America V Red Spot Jupiter

Even though astronomers have recently reported Jupiter’s super red, super big storm is at its smallest diameter ever–10,250 miles across–it still dwarfs North America. So next time work’s got you down, remember that your office isn’t even a fraction of a speck of a speck of a storm.

The Lifecycle Of A Queen (Bumble) Bee

August 5, 2014

First off, we’re talking about this kind of Queen Bee:

Bumblebee Facts Queen Bee

Source: APISUCS

Not this kind:

Bumblebee Facts Regina George

Source: Glamour

But when you get right down to it, they’re pretty similar. Both have striking features, they’re known to fight lesser creatures who threaten their social status, and they’re both bad bitches. Nobody ever said life on top was easy.

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