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Clyde Tombaugh: To Pluto And Beyond

Clyde Tombaugh Pluto Surface

Recent New Horizons photo of Pluto’s icy mountains. Source: NASA

Beyond the rocky planets neighboring Earth and both the outlying gas and ice giants, sits the dark and icy dwarf planet, Pluto.

Until July 14th of this year, when the New Horizons spacecraft made the closest-ever flyby, Pluto had never truly been explored. It was out of reach, nestled deep in the third zone of our solar system, the Kuiper Belt, a circling mass of frozen, asteroid-like objects whose inner edge is about 2.8 billion miles from the sun.

Until now, our perception of the dwarf planet has been shrouded mostly in mystery.

Clyde Tombaugh New Horizons Launch

The New Hoirzons spacecraft launches from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station on January 19, 2006. Source: Forbes

Yet there is one man aboard New Horizons without whom we wouldn’t be here at all.

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Inside The Life Of A Solitary Bee

According to Bristol, England-based conservation filmmakers Team Candiru, 90 percent of Britain’s bees are “solitary bees,” which are crucial pollinators whose value is little known or conserved.

Learn more about the daily affairs of these bees with this hi-resolution documentary by Candiru, and then brush up on your bee knowledge with us.

The Most Extreme Summer Weather Of 2015

Summer Weather 2015

Whether you think they’re signs of global warming or that Mother Nature is just working out some particularly painful kinks, it’s impossible to deny that summer 2015 has seen an insane amount of extreme weather events. From the massive blob of warm water covering thousands of miles in the Pacific Ocean to brutal, scorching temperatures torching places like Pakistan and Iran to a rain-battered Gulf Coast, this summer’s extreme conditions have left no part of the world untouched.

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After Ebola, Survivors Find Strength In Soccer

A new vaccine might spell the end of Ebola’s fatal touch, but before that, many in West Africa have struggled – and continue to struggle – to make sense of the disease that claimed at least four thousand lives within the region.

The disease produced thousands of victims, but it also produced survivors – nearly 16,000 of them, according to The New York Times. For many, surviving came with its own challenges: for example, how does someone like Sierra Leone resident Erison Turay cope with the fact that his life was spared while nearly his entire family was wiped out? What about the social stigma that accompanies – and potentially lasts longer – than the physical disease itself?

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