The Strangest Exoplanets We Have Ever Discovered

By definition, an exoplanet simply refers to a planet which orbits a star other than our Sun. This means that many of the trillions of trillions of planets that probably exist classify as exoplanets. One notable exception is rogue planets – planets that don’t orbit stars, instead directly orbiting the galaxies themselves.

Despite there likely being an absolutely huge number of planets in the Universe, we’ve only discovered about 1800 so far. That’s because spotting a planet is a lot harder than spotting a star – they are much smaller and much dimmer. Even the techniques we use to track down new planets like transit photometry and radial velocity work best at finding gas giants like Jupiter, not small rocky planets like Earth. Despite all of these obstacles, we have enjoyed great success when it comes to uncovering our galactic neighbors and, just like in your own neighborhood, some of them are a little peculiar.

1. Kepler-186f

Strangest Exoplanets Kepler

Source: UPR

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Why Can You See Your Breath When It’s Cold Out?

It’s winter. It’s cold. You’re miserable. Since you’re likely spending more time indoors, why not learn a little bit more about how wintry conditions make it so you can see your breath–and happiness–exiting your body?

The Shape Of The Milky Way’s Magnetic Field

Milky Way Magnetic Field

According to the European Space Agency, this Planck spacecraft-captured image reveals the shape of the Milky Way’s magnetic field. And, we might add, it looks oddly reminiscent of Vincent Van Gogh’s “Starry Night”.

How Close Are We To Bionic Skin?

Bionic Skin Future

Researchers in Seoul and Cambridge, MA, recently announced new advances in synthetic skin sensitivity.
Source: Pop Science

The history of replacing human skin with something else has been pretty weird from the start. The oldest recorded evidence of medical skin grafts is found in the Egyptian Papyrus of Ebers, which dates back to roughly 1,550 BCE. It describes grafting frog skin over a human wound. Since then, humanity has experimented with porcine skin grafts (‘porcine’ sounds so much loftier than ‘pig’ or ‘swine’, doesn’t it?), artificial skin made of spider silk, and skin grafts from amnion, the thin organic layer around babies in the womb that can be collected with the placenta after birth.

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